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Tag: Ronald Brautigam

Ludwig van Beethoven – Ronald Brautigam – Eroica, Variations (2012) [Hybrid-SACD] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Ludwig van Beethoven – Ronald Brautigam – Eroica, Variations (1796-1802)
SACD ISO (2.0/MCH): 3,60 GB | 24B/88,2kHz Stereo FLAC: 1,19 GB | Full Artwork | 3% Recovery Info
Label/Cat#: BIS # BIS-SACD-1673 | Country/Year: Sweden 2012
Genre: Classical | Style: Classical Period, Piano

The chief reason to buy this disc is for Brautigam’s dazzling performance of the Eroica Variations.

Infrequently played and recorded merely because it’s not one of the numbered 32 sonatas, the Eroica Variations is a clever, virtuoso work from the beginning of Beethoven’s second period. It exhibits the same kind of nervous energy as the 2nd Symphony, which this performance embodies.

Unlike many theme-and-variation pieces which can be a bit pedantic, instead of just stating the theme and going through a few contained variations, Beethoven opens the piece with the bass line to the main theme, puts it through three variations, then states the whole theme, puts it through 15 variations, and finally closes the work with a finale that includes a fugue.

Brautigam’s playing is brash, highlighting the dynamic contrasts of the music. He effectively pounds out the three dotted 8th note section of the theme that are peppered throughout the work. As I said before, the spirit of the 2nd Symphony (completed the same year as the Eroica Variations) permeates this performance.

As for the sound of the fortepiano, it works quite well. In the second variation, for example, its wiry sound is a natural fit with all the 16th notes.

The other variations on the disc date from Beethoven’s first period. While Brautigam and BIS deserve much praise for recording all of Beethoven’s solo keyboard music (has anyone else ever done this?), compared to the Eroica Variations, they are a bit inconsequential.

Like the previous releases in this series, BIS’s sound is excellent. All I can say are the usually adjectives of praise.

Since I received this disc a month and a half ago I’ve probably listened to the Eroica Variations nearly 20 times — like the previous releases, it’s Beethoven played to perfection. SA-CD.net

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W.A.Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 20 & 27 – Ronald Brautigam (2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

W.A.Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 20 & 27 / Ronald Brautigam (2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 53:34 minutes | 953 MB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical.com | Digital Booklet | @ BIS

Among the most widely performed of Mozart’s piano concertos for a good half century after its composition in 1785, the Concerto No.20 in D minor still assumes a commanding place in the concert hall.

Among its early devotees was Beethoven, who performed the work at a benefit concert for Mozart’s widow in March 1795 and who may well have found much to admire in the work’s brooding opening, characterized by syncopations and later punctuated by more aggressive outbursts; in his informative liner notes, the Mozart scholar John Irving goes so far as to call it ‘Mozart’s grittiest concerto’.

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Ronald Brautigam – Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas (2014) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1/88,2kHz]

Ronald Brautigam – Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas (2014)
9 Releases | FLAC (tracks) 24bit/44,1/88,2 kHz | Time – 654:22 minutes | 6,87 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical | Artwork: Covers & Digital booklets | @ BIS

Dutch pianist Ronald Brautigam divides his interpretive energies equally between the fortepiano and the conventional concert grand. Born in Amsterdam, Brautigam first studied with Dutch pianist Jan Wijn and later studies took him to the U.K. and to America, where he took classes with Rudolf Serkin. Brautigam first came to prominence in 1984 when he was awarded the Netherlands Music Prize, the highest distinction the Netherlands bestows on musicians.

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W.A.Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 20 & 27 – Ronald Brautigam (2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

W.A.Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 20 & 27 / Ronald Brautigam (2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 53:34 minutes | 953 MB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical.com | Digital Booklet | @ BIS

Among the most widely performed of Mozart’s piano concertos for a good half century after its composition in 1785, the Concerto No.20 in D minor still assumes a commanding place in the concert hall.

Among its early devotees was Beethoven, who performed the work at a benefit concert for Mozart’s widow in March 1795 and who may well have found much to admire in the work’s brooding opening, characterized by syncopations and later punctuated by more aggressive outbursts; in his informative liner notes, the Mozart scholar John Irving goes so far as to call it ‘Mozart’s grittiest concerto’.

Six years after the D minor concerto, in January 1791, the composer completed the Piano Concerto No.27 in B flat major, K595, giving the first performance of it two months later. This was to be his last public appearance as a soloist, and the concerto has sometimes been considered as a work in which the typical sparkle of Mozart’s virtuosity is tempered by resignation, as if the composer were already aware of his imminent demise. Such an interpretation is contradicted by a close study of the autograph manuscript, however: the concerto appears to have been begun two full years before it was completed.

Its language is nevertheless more introverted than most of Mozart’s works in the genre: he seems to be aiming for a sublime delicacy of expression rarely attempted elsewhere in his concerto output.
These two exceptional works are here performed by Ronald Brautigam and Die Kölner Akademie, on their fifth disc of Mozart’s concertos – an ongoing series which has been described as ‘a lucky break and a true delight’ in the German magazine Piano News.

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W.A.Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 19 & 23 – Ronald Brautigam (2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

W.A.Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 19 & 23 / Ronald Brautigam (2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 50:00 minutes | 845 MB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical.com | Digital Booklet | @ BIS

In just two years, between 1784 and 1786, Mozart composed no less than twelve piano concertos – a staggering number. Often described as one of the most light-hearted and buoyant among these is the Concerto in F major K459, sometimes called ‘the second Coronation Concerto’. The nickname comes from the fact that Mozart would later choose to perform it, along with the ‘Coronation Concerto’ in D major, during the festivities surrounding the coronation of Emperor Leopold II in Frankfurt-am-Main in 1790. Its companion work on this fourth disc in Ronald Brautigam’s survey hails from the same period: begun in 1784, the Concerto in A major K488 was completed in March 1786, at the same time as Mozart was putting the finishing touches to his opera Le nozze di Figaro. It is one of only three piano concertos in which Mozart uses clarinets in the orchestra, resulting in a very particular sound world, especially in the magical slow movement. Mozart clearly held the work in high regard, and described it as one of his most select compositions ‘which I keep just for myself and an élite circle of music lovers’, and later audiences have agreed with him. Ronald Brautigam has been described as ‘an absolutely instinctive Mozartian… with melodic playing of consummate beauty’ (International Record Review), and he is once again supported by the period orchestra Die Kölner Akademie conducted by Michael Alexander Willens in a partnership which more than one reviewer has termed ‘ideal’.

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Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas – Ronald Brautigam (2014) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1/88,2kHz]

Ronald Brautigam – Beethoven: The Complete Piano Sonatas (2014)
9 Releases | FLAC (tracks) 24bit/44,1/88,2 kHz | Time – 654:22 minutes | 6,87 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical | Artwork: Covers & Digital booklets | @ BIS

Dutch pianist Ronald Brautigam divides his interpretive energies equally between the fortepiano and the conventional concert grand. Born in Amsterdam, Brautigam first studied with Dutch pianist Jan Wijn and later studies took him to the U.K. and to America, where he took classes with Rudolf Serkin. Brautigam first came to prominence in 1984 when he was awarded the Netherlands Music Prize, the highest distinction the Netherlands bestows on musicians.

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