Skip to content

Tag: Ray Charles

Ray Charles – Live In Concert (1965) [APO Remaster 2012] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Ray Charles – Live In Concert (1965) [APO Remaster 2012]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 41:08 minutes | Scans included | 1,66 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 778 MB

This classic recording by Ray Charles includes 12 vintage tracks performed to perfection. His voice is in great shape, and the recording by Wally Heider is a marvel for its day; all the instruments are placed nicely with Charles’ voice out front where it belongs. There’s a slinky version of “Hallelujah I Love Her So,” the musicians creating nice little changes behind Charles’ soulful nuances. The singer tells us Miss Lillian Ford of the Raelets “helps out” on “Don’t Set Me Free”; it’s a duet and a nice change of pace. Rick Ward’s tacky liner notes fail to say who is backing up the singer at The Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, except for David “Fathead” Newman credited with the tenor solo on “Swing a Little Taste,” the opening track. Not to be confused with the 1973 re-release Ray Charles Live, which is comprised of 1958 and 1959 concerts, this album is called Live in Concert, and is Charles in Los Angeles after a Japanese tour in 1964. “What I’d Say” and a nice version of “Margie” are here, along with a six-minute take on “I Gotta Woman.” For the finale he has the Ray Charles Choir come out to help close the show with a marching-band version of “Pop Goes the Weasel.” The 12 tracks are priceless Ray Charles, especially the reinvention of “You Don’t Know Me,” stirringly different from his timeless hit version but just as impressive. Excellent photos by Ray Hearne, especially the cover profile.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – Genius Loves Company (2004) [2.0 & 5.1] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Ray Charles – Genius Loves Company (2004) [2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 51:34 minutess | Scans included | 3,38 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,03 GB

Genius Loves Company is the last studio album Ray Charles completed before his death in June 2004. Prior to this, the last studio album he released was Strong Love Affair in 1996, which was a stab at modern pop, filled with new songs and given an adult contemporary sheen. It was not one of his most distinctive efforts, even when judged against his latter-day albums, and it disappeared not long after its release. Charles left Warner and, years later, signed with Concord, who released Genius Loves Company, which had a decidedly different approach than the all-modern Strong Love Affair. As the title acknowledges with a wink, this is a duets album, which may be a little commonplace as far as latter-day superstar albums go but is still a step up from his previous studio album since it puts Ray Charles in a comfortable, relaxed situation that plays to his strengths. Instead of trying to put Charles in a modern setting, producers John Burk and Phil Ramone (Burk helmed seven of the album’s tracks, Ramone is responsible for the other five, and their work fits together seamlessly) go for a clean retro setting with a few guitars, synths, and a rhythm section, occasionally dressing it with an orchestra or some strings. In other words, apart from the glistening production, it’s not far removed from any of Charles’ crossover records from the ’60s, and he’s also given a strong set of songs, largely familiar pop classics, from “Fever” and “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” to “Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word” and “Crazy Love.” His duet partners are fairly predictable — classy newcomers like Norah Jones and Diana Krall, but also old stalwarts like Elton John, B.B. King, Johnny Mathis, James Taylor, Bonnie Raitt, and the ubiquitous Willie Nelson (who has never sounded older than he does here on “It Was a Very Good Year”) — but they’re also reliable, never overshadowing Ray yet never shrinking in his shadow either; in short, it sounds more like a real duets album than most superstar duet records. The end result is modest, friendly, laid-back, and pleasing, one that remains faithful to Charles’ music while sounding relatively fresh. It may not be weighty enough to be a career-capping masterpiece, but it’s sweet enough to be an appropriate final album — which is far more than can be said of Strong Love Affair, or any of the other albums he cut in the ’80s or ’90s for that matter.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – Genius + Soul = Jazz (1961) [Analogue Productions Remaster 2012] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Ray Charles – Genius+Soul=Jazz (1961) [Analogue Productions Remaster 2012]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 Stereo > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 36:50 minutes | Scans included | 1,49 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 772 MB

One of the best early-’60s examples of soul/jazz crossover, this record, like several of his dates from the period, featured big-band arrangements (played by the Count Basie band). This fared better than some of Charles’ similar outings, however, if only because it muted some of his straight pop aspirations in favor of some pretty mean and lean, cut-to-the-heart-of-the-matter B-3 Hammond organ licks. Most of the album is instrumental and swings pretty vivaciously, although Charles does take a couple of vocals with “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town” and “I’ve Got News for You.” Yet one of those instrumentals, a cover of the Clovers’ “One Mint Julep,” would give Charles one of his most unpredictable (and best) early-’60s hits.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – The Atlantic Studio Albums In Mono (2016) (Remastered) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Ray Charles – The Atlantic Studio Albums In Mono (2016) (Remastered)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz | Time – 42:59 minutes | 2,72 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Front Cover | © Rhino Atlantic

A music legend like no other, Ray Charles earned the nickname “Genius” for recording countless jazz, country, R&B and pop masterpieces during a career that spanned seven decades. This Box Set features mono mixes for the seven outstanding solo studio albums he recorded for Atlantic Records. For this new collection, the following albums have been fully remastered from the original mono analog tapes, echoing the experience of the era, when most fans were hearing music on record players, jukeboxes and radios that played music monaurally: Ray Charles (1957), The Great Ray Charles (1957), Yes, Indeed! (1958), What’d I Say (1959), The Genius Of Ray Charles (1959), The Genius After Hours (1961), and The Genius Sings The Blues (1961).

Comments closed

Ray Charles – Hit The Road Jack / The Danger Zone (Mono Version) (1961/2014) [Official Digital Download 24-bit/96kHz]

Ray Charles – Hit The Road Jack / The Danger Zone (Mono Version) (1961/2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 8:20 minutes | 78 MB | Genre: R&B
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | Front Cover | © BnF Collection

“Ray Charles ‎– Hit the Road Jack / The Danger Zone” was originally released in 1961 as 7″ 45 RPM vinyl EP by Véga Records, the French distributor for ABC-Paramount. ~ From the collection of Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – Live In Concert (1964/2012) [DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz]

Ray Charles – Live In Concert (1964/2012)
DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz  | Time – 41:03 minutes | 1,62 GB | Genre: Jazz
Source: ISO SACD | ©  ABC-Paramount
Recorded: 1964 September 20, Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California

In the half-century between his earliest recordings in the 1950s and his death in 2004, Ray Charles ascended to icon status by leaving his mark on virtually every form of American popular music that emerged in the latter half of the 20th century. Nowhere was this more evident than in his live performances, where one was likely to hear shades of blues, soul, R&B, jazz, gospel, country and more in a single evening – indeed, sometimes in a single song. To put it simply, the Right Reverend did it all.
All of these subtle shades and styles are evident on Ray Charles Live In Concert. Originally released by ABC-Paramount in early 1965, Live In Concert captured Ray at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles in September 1964. “There could be no more uplifting live musical experience than digging Ray Charles and his mighty orchestra in their prime,” says roots music historian Bill Dahl. Indeed, the 15-piece orchestra backing Ray on this date – assembled just a few years earlier in 1961 – boasted no less than a dozen horns, including formidable saxophonists David “Fathead” Newman, Hank Crawford and Leroy “Hog” Cooper, all of whom had been with Ray since his days as a leader of smaller combos.
A huge piece of the Ray Charles legacy is his mastery of any style he touched, and his ability to make it his own in a way that no other artist could – powers that can only come from an innate sense of adventure and spontaneity that are fully evident in Ray Charles Live In Concert.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – Genius Loves Company (2004) (10th Anniversary Edition ‘2014) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Ray Charles – Genius Loves Company (2004) (10th Anniversary Edition ‘2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 1:00:50 | 2.17 GB | Genre: R&B
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks  |  Digital Booklet  | © Concord Records

Upon its release in 2004, few could have predicted the extraordinary, game-changing effect that Ray Charles’ final recording would have on both his career and the industry as a whole.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – Rare Genius: The Undiscovered Masters (2010) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Ray Charles – Rare Genius: The Undiscovered Masters (2010)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 41:36 minutes | 817 MB | Genre: R&B
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Digital Booklet | © Concord Records

A treasure trove of newly discovered recordings, highlighted by a duet with fellow icon Johnny Cash (“Why Me Lord?”), Rare Genius was released by Concord Records in April 2010 to celebrate Charles’ 80th birthday (he would have turned 80 on September 23, 2010.

Culled from four decades worth of demos and other previously unreleased material, Rare Genius showcases the remarkable artistic vision, stylistic range and emotionally rich vocals that crafted Charles enduring legacy. An essential insight into one of the 20th Century’s greatest musical icons.

Comments closed

Ray Charles – The Ray Charles Story, Vol. 4 (1966/2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Ray Charles – The Ray Charles Story, Vol. 4 (1966/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Mono | Time – 41:10 | 1,59 GB | Genre: R&B
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks  |  Front Cover | @ Atlantic Records

The Ray Charles Story, Volume 4 is the fourth installment in a definitive collection showcasing Charles’ undeniable artistry and musicianship. One of Rolling Stones’s “100 Greatest Artists,” the album displays all of Charles’ biggest hits. The album includes standouts “Blackjack,” “A Bit Of Soul,” “Tell Me How Do You Feel” and “I Believe To My Soul.”

Comments closed

Ray Charles – The Ray Charles Story, Vol. 3 (1966/2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Ray Charles – The Ray Charles Story, Vol. 3 (1966/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Mono | Time – 39:15 | 828 MB | Genre: R&B
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks  |  Front Cover | @ Atlantic Records

The Ray Charles Story, Volume 3 is the third installment in a definitive collection highlighting Charles’ remarkable genius and unparalleled musicianship. The multi-GRAMMY® winner has been dubbed one of music’s greatest artists by Rolling Stone. Included on the set were his hits, “That’s Enough,” “Tell The Truth,” and “It’s Alright.”

Comments closed
%d bloggers like this: