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Tag: Neil Young

Neil Young – This Note’s for You (1988/2019) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Neil Young – This Note’s for You (1988/2019)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 39:12 minutes | 782 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Reprise

The 16th studio album from Neil Young, This Note’s For You was released in 1988 and was originally credited to Young & The Bluenotes. The overall theme of the album relates to the commercialism of rock and roll. The video for the title track was basically a parody of corporate rock and advertising which featured a Michael Jackson look-alike whose hair catches fire. The video was nominated for a Grammy in the category of “Best Concept Video” in 1989.

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Neil Young – Songs for Judy – Live (Remastered) (2018) [Official Digital Download 24bit/176,4kHz]

Neil Young – Songs for Judy – Live (Remastered) (2018)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/176,4 kHz | Time – 01:19:13 minutes | 2,64 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Reprise

Neil Young’s archives are a bottomless treasure chest. The Loner has unearthed some hidden gems from 1976, the year when he was on tour both with his group, Crazy Horse, and as a solo acoustic artist, not forgetting his shows with Stephen Stills with whom he released the album Long May You Run in September. Songs for Judy focuses on his solo acoustic performances and comprises of around twenty tracks that he recorded in Boston, Atlanta, Fort Worth, Houston, Madison, Chicago and New York throughout November. They are mostly his classic hits (Heart of Gold, After the Gold Rush, The Needle and the Damage Done) but there are also some less well-known ones (No One Seems to Know). This was Neil Young when he was surfing an incredible wave of creativity, in just two years he composed three masterpieces: On the Beach, Tonight’s the Night and Zuma. The content of his compositions is truly impressive, and despite only being equipped with a guitar, piano, organ and harmonica, the recordings are flawless and deserving of being played on a loop. Even if these kinds of unpublished recordings are recommended first and foremost for Neil Young fans, for those who aren’t as familiar with his music this is a great place to begin.  – Marc Zisman

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Neil Young – ROXY: Tonight’s the Night Live (2018) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Neil Young – ROXY: Tonight’s the Night Live (2018)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 53:09 minutes | 1,9 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Booklet, Front Cover | © Reprise

Roxy – Tonight’s The Night Live is one of the most sought-after recordings from his vast archives. This was the first public performance of many of the songs that would make up Young’s seminal album Tonight’s The Night, which would not be released until June 1975. The album’s final track “Walk On” would not appear until the release of On The Beach, in July 1974. Young would be the first artist to christen the stage at what would become one of the world’s great clubs, The Roxy Theater on the riotous Sunset Strip, right next door to the already infamous Rainbow Bar & Grille. The shows took place on September 20-22, 1973.

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Neil Young – Hawks & Doves (1980/2003) [DVD Audio to FLAC 24bit/176,4kHz]

Neil Young – Hawks & Doves (1980/2003)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/176.4kHz | Time – 00:30:33 minutes | 908 MB | Genre: Rock
Source: DVD-Audio (Watermarked!)  | Front cover | © Reprise Records
Recorded: 1974–77, 1980 at Quadrafonic, Nashville; Village Recorders, LA; Indigo Recording Studio, Malibu; Triad Recording Studio, Ft. Lauderdale, FL and Gold Star Recording Studio, Hollywood, CA

Following the triumph of Rust Never Sleeps, Hawks & Doves benefited from the enormous critical goodwill Neil Young had amassed, though fans and critics nevertheless were baffled by its set of obscure acoustic and country-tinged songs. The seven-plus-minute “The Old Homestead” (copyright 1974) was interpreted by some as an allegory for Young’s relationship to CSNY, perhaps because that was the only way to make any sense of the most mysterious Young lyric since “The Last Trip to Tulsa.” In retrospect, now that it’s known Young was distracted by domestic medical concerns while working on the album, its theme of perseverance in the face of adversity, both in a personal context of family commitment (“Stayin’ Power,” “Coastline”), and in a national context of hard work and patriotism (“Union Man,” “Comin’ Apart at Every Nail,” “Hawks & Doves”) seems more apparent, as does the sense that Young may have been trying to fulfill his recording contract (even with the inclusion of trunk songs like “The Old Homestead,” the album runs less than half an hour) while devoting a bare minimum of his time and attention to the effort. The result is correspondingly slight. –William Ruhlmann

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Neil Young – Prairie Wind (2005/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Neil Young – Prairie Wind (2005/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 52:11 minutes | 1,07 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Reprise

Since Prairie Wind is a return to the soft, lush country-rock sound of Harvest; since Neil Young suffered a brain aneurysm during its recording; since it finds the singer/songwriter reflecting on life and family in the wake of his father’s death; and since it’s his most cohesive album in a decade, it would seem that all these factors add up to a latter-day masterpiece for Young, but that’s not quite the case. Prairie Wind manages to be less than the sum of its parts and the problem isn’t a lack of good songs (although it does have a few more clunkers than it should) or a botched concept. Young’s decision to revive the country-rock that brought him his greatest popularity never feels like a cynical move — the music is too warm, comfortable, and friendly to feel like anything but Neil playing to his strengths. However, since he cut this in Nashville with a bunch of studio pros including legendary keyboardist Spooner Oldham, it feels just a tad slicker than perhaps it should, since the smooth sound inadvertently highlights the sentimentality of the project. It’s hard to begrudge Young if he wants to indulge in rose-colored memories — a brush with death coupled with a loss of a parent tends to bring out sentimentality — but such backward-gazing songs as “Far from Home” feel just a hair too close to trite, and the easy-rolling nature of the record doesn’t lend them much gravity. There a few other songs that tend toward too close to the simplistic, whether it’s the specific invocations of 9/11 and Chris Rock on “No Wonder” or the supremely silly Elvis salute “He Was the King,” which are just enough to undermine the flow of the album, even if they fit into the general autumnal, reflective mood of the record. But since they do fit the overall feel of the album, and since they’re better, even with their flaws, than the best songs on, say, Silver & Gold or Broken Arrow or Are You Passionate?, they help elevate the whole of Prairie Wind, particularly because there are some genuinely strong Young songs here: the moody opener “The Painter,” the gently sighing “Fallin’ off the Face of the Earth,” the ethereal “It’s a Dream,” the sweet, laid-back “Here for Your,” the understated “This Old Guitar” (there’s also the sweeping “When God Made Me,” recorded complete with a gospel chorus, one that will either strike a listener as moving or maudlin — a latter-day “A Man Needs a Maid,” only not as strong). This set of songs does indeed make Prairie Wind a better album than anything Young has released in the past decade, which means that it’s easy to overrate it. For despite all of its strengths, neither the recording nor the songs are as memorable or as fully realized as his late-’80s/early-’90s comeback records — Freedom, Ragged Glory, and Harvest Moon — let alone his classic ’70s work. Nevertheless, it’s the closest Young has come to making a record that could hold its own with those albums in well over a decade, which means it’s worthwhile even if it’s never quite as great as it seems like it could have been. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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Neil Young – Peace Trail (2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Neil Young – Peace Trail (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 38:22 minutes | 1,3 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Front Cover | ©  Reprise

Peace Trail features all new songs that Young wrote since the release of his album EARTH, this past June. This new album is primarily acoustic and reflects an intimate, sparse approach to each of the ten songs within.

“Neil Young matches the fire in his belly to the poetry from his pen for one of the most gripping outings of his long career. This riveting collection, a spare acoustic-electric hybrid, seethes with righteous indignation over a plethora of social and political injustices, but also soothes with deeply felt empathy for those on the receiving end of iniquity.” – Los Angeles Times / Randy Lewis

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Neil Young – Sugar Mountain – Live At Canterbury House 1968 (2008/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Neil Young – Sugar Mountain – Live At Canterbury House 1968 (2008/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 01:10:13 minutes | 2,3 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: PonoMusic | Front Cover | © Reprise Records
Recorded live at Canterbury House, Ann Arbor, MI, November 9 & 10, 1968

Sugar Mountain – Live at Canterbury House 1968 is a live album by Neil Young. On November 8–10, 1968, Young performed three shows at Canterbury House in Ann Arbor, Michigan. This album is compiled from the performances on the 9th and 10th.

This album is Volume 00 in the Archives Performance Series. Since volumes 2 and 3 had already been released, this album, though performed earlier chronologically, is the third release from the Series. The Riverboat 1969, released in The Archives Vol. 1 1963–1972 in 2009, is the fourth Archive Performance Series released but was performed earlier chronologically than volumes 2 and 3.

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Neil Young + Stray Gators – Tuscaloosa Live (2019) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Neil Young + Stray Gators – Tuscaloosa Live (2019)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 52:29 minutes | 1,11 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Reprise

Tuscaloosa is an 11-track live album from Neil Young and The Stray Gators, recorded at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa on February 5th 1973. The Stray Gators backed Neil occasionally in the ‘70’s and are Tim Drummond, Kenny Buttrey, Jack Nitzsche and Ben Keith. The album was produced by Neil Young and Elliot Mazer and mixed by John Hanlon. It is mastered by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman from the original analogue tapes

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Neil Young – Live at Massey Hall 1971 (2007/2019) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Neil Young – Live at Massey Hall 1971 (2007/2019)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 01:07:27 minutes | 1,36 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Reprise

The acclaimed Toronto performance features classics “Old Man” and, in a suite, “A Man Needs A Maid” and “Heart Of Gold” (before they were recorded for Harvest) along with some of his most popular songs (“Cowgirl In The Sand,” “Ohio”) as well as the most obscure (“Bad Fog Of Loneliness”). Live At Massey Hall is a rock gem.

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Neil Young – Dead Man (Music from and Inspired by the Motion Picture) (1996/2019) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Neil Young – Dead Man (Music from and Inspired by the Motion Picture) (1996/2019)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/44,1 kHz  | Time – 01:02:16 minutes | 646 MB | Genre: Soundtrack
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Vapor Records

Dead Man is one of those unusual (and often legendary) soundtracks that a director or fan simply “hands over” to a jazz or folk star who improvises to the film that has already been edited. Released in 1996, Jim Jarmusch’s feature film tells the story of the wanderings of William Blake (Johnny Depp) and the Indian Nobody (Gary Farmer) through the Wild West in the late 19th century. Neil Young’s music is light years away from the epic scores found in the golden era of Hollywood westerns and is instead based on just the electric guitar, which is only replaced by an organ for the duration of one track (Organ Solo). The haunting sound of the electric guitar together with the magnificent black and white film plays a key part in creating Dead Man’s strange and psychedelic atmosphere, which is why there are six Guitar Solos on the soundtrack. Sensual, tortured and endearing, Neil Young’s guitar seems bewitched by the film’s visuals and he makes full use of effects like reverberation, distortion and delay. It is rare to find music so physically connected to a film and the marginality of the characters. Among the album’s bravura pieces are the lyrical Solo No.5 (which is almost 15 minutes long), as well as Solo No.6, whose effects sound like the cries of an injured animal. The track ends with the very poignant repetition of two simple notes, and with that the film ends too. It should also be pointed out that there are passages interspersed throughout the album during which Johnny Depp recites poems by William Blake. – Nicolas Magenham

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