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Tag: Miles Davis

The Miles Davis Quintet – The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions (Mono Remastered) (2019) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

The Miles Davis Quintet – The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions (Mono Remastered) (2019)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 03:11:39 minutes | 8,25 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front cover | © Craft Recordings

Celebrating the 70th anniversary of Prestige Records, the selection presents the quintet’s marathon sessions for the iconic jazz label, recorded between 1955–56, which resulted in classic albums such as Cookin’, Relaxin’, Workin’, and Steamin’.

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Miles Davis – Miles: The New Miles Davis Quintet (1956/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Miles Davis – Miles: The New Miles Davis Quintet (1956/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 34:00 minutes | 877 MB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Booklet, Front Cover | © Prestige Records

This album was the first to be released showcasing Miles Davis and his new quintet (John Coltrane on tenor sax, Red Garland on piano, Paul Chambers on bass and Philly Joe Jones on drums). However it was not the first that Davis recorded with this quintet: before Davis could leave Prestige for his new record label, Columbia, he had to fulfill the remainder of his contract.

This was accomplished by two “marathon” sessions in May and October, 1956 that gave birth to four separate albums: Cookin’, Relaxin’, Workin’ and Steamin’. Davis actually recorded his first sessions for Columbia months earlier, in the fall of 1955, with his new quintet. The group’s club performances were exciting, marking the beginning of the period in which Davis became a celebrity, wearing Italian suits and driving Italian cars. He also became known for turning his back to the audience. Davis once explained this move very simply: “Hank Mobley is taking a solo. I want the audience concentrating on him, so I walk off the stage. They don’t need to be looking at me”.

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Miles Davis – Kind Of Blue (1959/2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Miles Davis – Birth Of The Cool (1957/2013) Stereo/Mono
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 45:26 minutes | 1,61 GB / 866 MB | Genre: Jazz
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | Digital booklet |  © Columbia/Legacy

Kind of Blue is an album most have heard many times before in a wide variety of formats. Now, you can hear it as if you were right there in the recording studio with the musicians! After many years, Sony finally decided to remaster Kind of Blue hi-res at 192kHz/24bit with the brilliant engineer Mark Wilder and the dedicated and knowledgeable producer Steve Berkowtiz (who has spent more time with and knows this album better than anyone out there). The quality of sound on this recording is unparalleled—listening to this release is like being in the studio with Miles.

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Miles Davis – The Last Word: The Warner Bros. Years (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Miles Davis – The Last Word: The Warner Bros. Years (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 6:57:17 minutes | 4,67 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | @ Rhino/Warner Bros.

8 disc set from Miles’ work in the 1980-1990s plus live performances. Newly remastered in 2015.

Disc 1 – Tutu
Disc 2 – Music From Siesta (With Marcus Miller)
Disc 3 – Amandla
Disc 4 – Dingo Original Soundtrack (With Michele Legrand)
Disc 5 – Doo Bop
Disc 6 – Miles & Quincy Live At Montreux
Disc 7 – Live Around The World
Disc 8 – Live Performance from Nice Festival, France

In 1985, Miles Davis shocked the music world by moving from Columbia to Warner Bros.. He immediately started working on an album called Perfect Way after a tune by Scritti Politti, later renamed Tutu by producer Tommy LiPuma. When Tutu (a tribute to Desmond Tutu) was released in 1986, it re-ignited Miles Davis’ career, crossing over into the rock and pop markets and winning him two Grammy Awards. A definitive collection of the later part of Miles Davis’ work, fully remastered, from the Warner Bros studio albums Tutu, Amandla and Doo-Bop, the Dingo and Siesta soundtracks, live recordings with Quincy Jones, and the likes of Kenny Garrett, Foley and Adam Holzman.

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Miles Davis – My Funny Valentine (1965) [MFSL 2014] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Miles Davis – My Funny Valentine (1965) [MFSL 2014]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 63:49 minutes | Scans included | 2,57 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 1,18 GB
Genre: Jazz

Miles Davis’ concert of February 12, 1964, was divided into two LPs, with all of the ballads put on My Funny Valentine. These five lengthy tracks (specifically, “All of You,” “Stella by Starlight,” “All Blues,” “I Thought About You,” and the title cut) put the emphasis on the lyricism of Davis, along with some strong statements from tenor saxophonist George Coleman and freer moments from the young rhythm section of pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Tony Williams. This hour-long LP complements the up-tempo romps of Four & More.

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Miles Davis – Bags’ Groove (1957) [APO Remaster 2014] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Miles Davis – Bags’ Groove (1957) [APO Remaster 2014]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 46:02 minutes | Scans included | 1,93 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 904 MB
Genre: Jazz

There are a multitude of reasons why Bags’ Groove remains a cornerstone of the post-bop genre. Of course there will always be the lure of the urban myth surrounding the Christmas Eve 1954 session — featuring Thelonious Monk — which is documented on the two takes of the title track. There are obviously more tangible elements, such as Davis’ practically telepathic runs with Sonny Rollins (tenor sax). Or Horace Silver’s (piano) uncanny ability to provide a stream of chord progressions that supply a second inconspicuous lead without ever overpowering. Indeed, Davis’ choice of former Dizzy Gillespie Orchestra and concurrent Modern Jazz Quartet members Milt Jackson (vibes), Kenny Clarke (drums), and Percy Heath (bass) is obviously well-informed. This combo became synonymous with the ability to tastefully improvise and provide bluesy bop lines in varied settings. The up-tempo and Latin-infused syncopation featured during the opening of “Airegin” flows into lines and minor-chord phrasings that would reappear several years later throughout Davis’ Sketches of Spain epic. The fun and slightly maniacally toned “Oleo” features one of Heath’s most impressive displays on Bags’ Groove. His staccato accompaniment exhibits the effortless nature with which these jazz giants are able to incorporate round after round of solos onto the larger unit. Bags’ Groove belongs as a cornerstone of all jazz collections. Likewise, the neophyte as well as the seasoned jazz enthusiast will find much to discover and rediscover throughout the disc.

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Miles Davis – Sorcerer (1967) [Japanese Reissue 2007] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Miles Davis – Sorcerer (1967) [Japanese Reissue 2007]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 39:59 minutes | Scans NOT included | 1,62 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans NOT included | 796 MB
Genre: Jazz

Sorcerer, the third album by the second Miles Davis Quintet, is in a sense a transitional album, a quiet, subdued affair that rarely blows hot, choosing to explore cerebral tonal colorings. Even when the tempo picks up, as it does on the title track, there’s little of the dense, manic energy on Miles Smiles — this is about subtle shadings, even when the compositions are as memorable as Tony Williams’ “Pee Wee” or Herbie Hancock’s “Sorcerer.” As such, it’s a little elusive, since it represents the deepening of the band’s music as they choose to explore different territory. The emphasis is as much on complex, interweaving chords and a coolly relaxed sound as it is on sheer improvisation, though each member tears off thoroughly compelling solos. Still, the individual flights aren’t placed at the forefront the way they were on the two predecessors — it all merges together, pointing toward the dense soundscapes of Miles’ later ’60s work. It’s such a layered, intriguing work that the final cut, recorded in 1962 with Bob Dorough on vocals, is an utterly jarring, inappropriate way to end the record, even if it’s intended as a tribute to Miles’ then-girlfriend (later, his wife), Cicely Tyson (whose image graces the cover).

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Miles Davis – Sorcerer (1967) [MFSL 2015] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Miles Davis – Sorcerer (1967) [MFSL 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 40:24 minutes | Scans included | 1,62 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 793 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2145 | Genre: Jazz

Sorcerer, the third album by the second Miles Davis Quintet, is in a sense a transitional album, a quiet, subdued affair that rarely blows hot, choosing to explore cerebral tonal colorings. Even when the tempo picks up, as it does on the title track, there’s little of the dense, manic energy on Miles Smiles — this is about subtle shadings, even when the compositions are as memorable as Tony Williams’ “Pee Wee” or Herbie Hancock’s “Sorcerer.” As such, it’s a little elusive, since it represents the deepening of the band’s music as they choose to explore different territory. The emphasis is as much on complex, interweaving chords and a coolly relaxed sound as it is on sheer improvisation, though each member tears off thoroughly compelling solos. Still, the individual flights aren’t placed at the forefront the way they were on the two predecessors — it all merges together, pointing toward the dense soundscapes of Miles’ later ’60s work. It’s such a layered, intriguing work that the final cut, recorded in 1962 with Bob Dorough on vocals, is an utterly jarring, inappropriate way to end the record, even if it’s intended as a tribute to Miles’ then-girlfriend (later, his wife), Cicely Tyson (whose image graces the cover).

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Miles Davis – Filles De Kilimanjaro (1969) [Japanese Reissue 2002] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Miles Davis – Filles De Kilimanjaro (1969) [Japanese Reissue 2002]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 56:21 minutes | Scans included | 2,3 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 1,09 GB
Genre: Jazz

Since it’s billed as “Directions in Music by Miles Davis,” it should come as little surprise that Filles de Kilimanjaro is the beginning of a new phase for Miles, the place that he begins to dive headfirst into jazz-rock fusion. It also happens to be the swan song for his second classic quintet, arguably the finest collective of musicians he ever worked with, and what makes this album so fascinating is that it’s possible to hear the breaking point — though his quintet all followed him into fusion (three of his supporting players were on In a Silent Way), it’s possible to hear them all break with the conventional notions of what constituted even adventurous jazz, turning into something new. According to Miles, the change in “direction” was as much inspired by a desire to return to something earthy and bluesy as it was to find new musical territory, and Filles de Kilimanjaro bears him out. Though the album sports inexplicable, rather ridiculous French song titles, this is music that is unpretentiously adventurous, grounded in driving, mildly funky rhythms and bluesy growls from Miles, graced with weird, colorful flourishes from the band. Where Miles in the Sky meandered a bit, this is considerably more focused, even on the three songs that run over ten minutes, yet it still feels transitional. Not tentative (which In the Sky was), but certainly the music that would spring full bloom on In a Silent Way was still in the gestation phase, and despite the rock-blues-n-funk touches here, the music doesn’t fly and search the way that Nefertiti did. But that’s not a bad thing — this middle ground between the adventurous bop of the mid-’60s and the fusion of the late ’60s is rewarding in its own right, since it’s possible to hear great musicians find the foundation of a new form. For that alone, Filles de Kilimanjaro is necessary listening.

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Miles Davis – In Person: Saturday Night At The Blackhawk, San Francisco Vol.2 (1961) [Japanese Reissue 2000] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Miles Davis – In Person: Saturday Night At The Blackhawk, San Francisco Vol.2 (1961) [Japanese Reissue 2000]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 60:53 minutes | Scans included | 2,47 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 1,21 GB
Genre: Jazz

The second volume in the (finally) complete recordings from Miles Davis’ legendary two-night stand at the Blackhawk in 1961 with his new quintet — which featured Hank Mobley, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers, and Jimmy Cobb — is as stunning as the first. While this set has been available in many different configurations in the U.S. and Japan over the years, it has never been complete until now. In Person: Saturday Night at the Blackhawk features no less than nine unreleased performances — including an unprecedented fourth set on two CDs. The groove is quite different on Saturday evening. Rather than the slashing bop of Sonny Rollins’ “Oleo” from Friday, a loping, bluesed-out version of “If I Were a Bell” opens the program. Kelly’s interplay with Davis here is enlightening and inspiring; his comps and fills dance around the trumpeter’s solo without ever punching through its center. His sense of timing is remarkable in how he anticipates the end of Miles’ lines. He shifts gears with Mobley, who is in a speedier Coleman Hawkins mood here and pushes the middle harder, more percussively, as Mobley then plays all around the changes. This gives way to an unbelievably speedy “So What,” clocking in at over 12 minutes and driven by Chambers’ pizzicato bass playing. Davis’ solo in the first few choruses is more reminiscent of his tenure with Charlie Parker than anything of his own, except for the warmer tone. The tune is an odyssey of harmonic invention with Kelly acting as a bridge between Davis and Mobley, offering wide-open sevenths and diminished fifths for each player to wander in and out of. Kelly’s solo comes right out of the blues, pure and angular; his touch is heavier — deep left-hand accents and trills decorate it.

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