Skip to content

Tag: King Crimson

King Crimson – Heaven & Earth (2019) [18CD + 4 Blu-ray Super Deluxe Box Set]

This box set features 18 CDs, 3 x blu-ray audio, one blu-ray video and two DVD-Audio discs. The first three CDs are devoted to enhanced version of the studio albums The ConstruKction Of Light (2000) and The Power to Believe (2003). The former has been remixed (by Don Gunn) and features all new drums by Pat Mastelotto and has a new moniker The ReconstruKction Of Light. The Power to Believe is featured as an extended/enhanced stereo mix and includes the studio version of Happy With What You Have To Be Happy With and Level 5.

The next four CDs feature the instrumental/improvised ProjeKcts, er, projects, described as “research and development” by Robert Fripp. These are all new to CD and each ‘ProjeKct’ each CD features a different line-up.

A further 11 CDs feature live recordings (several new to CD, with some material previously unreleased) from the 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2008 tours.

Of the three blu-ray audios:

  • Disc One contains the complete recordings of ProjeKcts 1, 3, 4 & 6 – every single concert plus additional material the ProjeKcts released, it features the complete albums: ProjeKct 1- Space Groove, The ProjeKcts – 4CD box, ProjeKct 1 – Jazz Café Suite, ProjeKct X – Heaven & Earth, BPM&M – ExtraKcts & ArtifaKcts and Rieflin/Fripp/Gunn – Repercussions of Angelic Behaviour
  • Disc Two contains the complete recordings of ProjeKct 2 (every single concert). More than 30 shows plus an album’s worth of rehearsals.
  • Disc Three contains The ReconstruKction Of Light – the album in stereo and 5.1 mixes with the drums completely re-recorded by Pat Mastelotto – stereo mixes by Don Gunn, 5.1 mixes by David Singleton and the original album in hi-res stereo, The Power to Believe – expanded/enhanced 2019 master (2 tracks with additional elements plus 3 extra tracks assembled/mixed by David Singleton) and 5.1 surround mixes by David Singleton – all mixes executive produced by Robert Fripp – plus the Happy With What You Have To Be Happy With and Level 5 mini-albums, the 2000 show from London, the EleKtriK live album from 2003 and a video of a tour of the KC studio/live equipment setup from 2002.

There is also blu-Ray video disc of Europe 2000 – The Bootleg TV tour, which features around 10 hours of audio/video mostly never seen/heard since the concerts with versions of selected songs and improvs (usually two per night of each) from almost every show. Includes footage and music from 20 performances.

Comments closed

King Crimson – Three of a Perfect Pair (1984/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – Three of a Perfect Pair (1984/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:08:14 minutes | 734 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

Upon its release in 1984, Three of a Perfect Pair caused some unrest among fans of King Crimson. Most of their audience felt that the band had made a conscious and obvious decision to try to break through to a more mainstream pop audience. But in hindsight, this is hardly the case; it sounds unlike anything that was out at the time. Like 1982’s Beat, Three of a Perfect Pair doesn’t quite meet the high standards set by 1981’s Discipline, but does contain a few Crimson treats. The opening title track has an unrelenting groove that never seems to let up, while “Sleepless” starts off with Tony Levin laying down some funky bass until Adrian Belew’s trademark paranoid vocals kick in and assure the listener that “it’s alright to feel a little fear.” Also included are the seven-minute instrumental soundscape “Industry,” and the cautionary tale of a “Model Man.” This would prove to be the new King Crimson’s last release for nearly ten years; the group disbanded soon after as its members concentrated on solo careers and other projects, until a mid-’90s reunion brought them all back together.

Comments closed

King Crimson – THRAK (1995/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – THRAK (1995/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:00:13 minutes | 681 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

The only progressive rock band from the ’60s to be making new, vital, progressive music in the ’90s, King Crimson returned from a ten-year exile in 1995 with THRAK, their first album since 1984’s Three of a Perfect Pair. As with the ’80s band, guitarist/ringleader Robert Fripp recruited singer/guitarist Adrian Belew, bassist Tony Levin, and drummer Bill Bruford for this incarnation of his classic band. However, he added to this familiar quartet two new members: Chapman Stick player Trey Gunn and ex-Mr. Mister drummer Pat Mastelotto. Effectively, Fripp created a “double trio,” and the six musicians combine their instruments in extremely unique ways. The mix is very dense, overpoweringly so at times, but careful listens will reveal that each musician has his own place in each song; the denseness of the sound is by design, not the accidental result of too many cooks in the kitchen. Sometimes, as in “THRAK,” the two trios are set against each other, in some sort of musical faux combat. In others, they just combine their respective sounds to massive effect. On “Dinosaur,” perhaps the strongest track on the record, Mastelotto and Bruford set up an ominous tom-tom groove that supports an even more ominous guitar figure. The vocal, the musings of a long-dead sauropod, are vintage Belew, just as the freaky, falling-down-the-stairs solo in the middle is vintage Fripp. Other high points include the drum duet “B’Boom” and the two Belew/Fripp “Inner Garden” pieces. Allusions to earlier Crimson abounds, such as the form of “VROOM,” for example, which is suspiciously reminiscent of “Red” (from the 1974 album of the same name), or the shout-out to “The Sheltering Sky” (from 1981’s Discipline) in “Walking on Air.” Thankfully, this never gets annoying, but instead acts as a subtle nudge and a wink to faithful fans. King Crimson came back in a major way with THRAK, and proved that, even in its fourth major incarnation, Fripp and company still had something to say. High-quality prog. ~ Daniel Gioffre

Comments closed

King Crimson – The Power to Believe (2003/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – The Power to Believe (2003/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 51:11 minutes | 567 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

The Power to Believe (2003) marks the return of King Crimson for the group’s first full-length studio release since ConstruKction of Light (2000). While it draws upon material featured on the live Level Five (2001) and studio Happy with What You Have to Be Happy With (2002) extended-play discs, there are also several new sonic sculptures included. Among them is the title track, which is divided into a series of central thematic motifs much in the same manner as the “Larks’ Tongues in Aspic” movements had done in the past. This 21st century schizoid band ably bears the torch of its predecessors with the same ballsy aggression that has informed other seminal King Crimson works – such as In the Court of the Crimson King (1969), Red (1974), and more recently THRAK (1995). This incarnation of the Mighty Krim includes the excessively talented quartet of Adrian Belew (guitar/vocals), Robert Fripp (guitar), Trey Gunn (Warr guitar/Warr fretless guitar), and Pat Mastelotto (percussion). Under the auspices of Machine – whose notable productions include post-grunge and industrial medalists Pitchshifter and White Zombie – the combo unleashes a torrent of alternating sonic belligerence (“Level Five”) and inescapable beauty (“Eyes Wide Open”). These extremes are linked as well as juxtaposed by equally challenging soundscapes from Fripp on “The Facts of Life: Intro” as well as Belew’s series of “The Power to Believe” haikus. The disc is fleshed out with some choice extended instrumentals such as “Elektrik” and “Dangerous Curves,” boasting tricky time signatures that are indelibly linked to equally engaging melodies. Both “Happy With What You Have to Be Happy With” and “Facts of Life” stand out as the (dare say) perfect coalescence of Belew’s uncanny Beatlesque lyrical sense with the sort of bare-knuckled, in your face aural attack that has defined King Crimson for over three decades. If the bandmembers’ constant tone probing is an active search to find the unwitting consciousness of a decidedly younger, rowdier, and more demanding audience, their collective mission is most assuredly accomplished on The Power to Believe – even more so than the tripped-out psychedelic prog rock behemoth from whence they initially emerged.

Comments closed

King Crimson – The ConstruKction of Light (2000/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – The ConstruKction of Light (2000/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:16:25 minutes | 863 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

King Crimson, one of the few first-generation progressive rock bands to remain nearly consistent in the quality of their output throughout their career, fall flat with The ConstruKction of Light, the band’s 12th studio album. Unable to shed the weight of their oft-brilliant history, the most promising moments of ConstruKction are crushed underneath the bulk. What makes ConstruKction such a disappointment is, despite how “progressive” the band-fragmenting ProjeKct approach appeared on paper, upon execution, it produced an utterly backward-looking album. More self-referential than a Jean-Luc Godard film, nearly every song on ConstruKction contains a heavy-handed nod to a previous Crimson song. There are even two tracks that are directly named after old Crimson material: “FraKctured” and “Larks Tongues in Aspic-Part IV.” The most notable shift the pared-down, four-piece Crimson makes with ConstruKction is getting rid of acoustic drums in favor of electronic “V” drums (courtesy of Pat Mastelotto, who took over full-time duties after Bruford left). Crimson does not seem to lose much in the transition, and, overall, the musicianship is superb as usual, but it’s almost as if they thought new technology and a stripped down lineup would make up for a dearth of new ideas. Treading water is still treading water, even if the waters happen to be deep. There are, however, two bright spots on the album: “Into the Frying Pan” and “Heaven and Earth.” The former features guitarist/vocalist Adrian Belew at his quirky best, and the latter (credited to Project X instead of King Crimson) is a beautifully textured, near-ambient piece that slowly builds intensity before a long, slow release. Together, they suggest that King Crimson may still have some gas left in their tank after all.

Comments closed

King Crimson – Radical Action To Unseat the Hold of Monkey Mind (Live) (2017) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – Radical Action To Unseat the Hold of Monkey Mind (Live) (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 02:40:49 minutes | 1,77 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

It has been stated many times that King Crimson is not so much a band as it is “a way of doing things”. Less frequently stated but equally true, is the fact that the band inevitably seeks different ways of doing things. The current incarnation of the band, 2014 – the present day, has already released two taster sets in the form of 2015’s Live at the Orpheum mini-album and the vinyl picture disc EP that accompanied the 2015 tours of Canada and Japan, while the full raw concert performance from a single night in Toronto in 2015 was presented as a 2CD set earlier this year to great acclaim. Now, with the release of Radical Action comes the most fully realised audio and visual statement from this band to date, running to three themed CDs and a Blu-Ray disc offering the filmed content along with an audio only option in lossless high resolution stereo and surround sound.

Comments closed

King Crimson – Lizard (1970/2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – Lizard (1970/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 59:20 minutes | 608 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

Released in December 1970, King Crimson’s third studio album, Lizard, is often viewed as an outlier in the pioneering British prog outfit’s nearly half-century discography. It’s not easily grouped with 1969’s stunning In the Court of the Crimson King debut and 1970 follow-up In the Wake of Poseidon, and along with 1971’s Islands it’s considered a transitional release on the band’s path toward the relative stability of the Larks’ Tongues in Aspic (1973), Starless and Bible Black (1974), and Red (1974) trilogy. Plus, the Lizard sessions were difficult and the core group lineup acrimoniously collapsed immediately afterward, as bandleader/guitarist Robert Fripp, with lyricist Peter Sinfield, continued brave efforts to save King Crimson from disintegrating as the group’s lengthy history was just getting underway. Even Fripp himself wasn’t a big Lizard fan until he reportedly “heard the Music in the music” when listening to Steven Wilson’s 2009 40th anniversary remix. Yet there are plenty of Crimson followers who place Lizard at the very apex of the group’s recorded legacy – and with good reason. Seamlessly blending rock, jazz, and classical in a way that few albums have successfully achieved, Lizard is epic, intimate, cacophonic, and subtle by turn – and infused with the dark moods first heard when “21st Century Schizoid Man” and “Epitaph” reached listeners’ ears the previous year.

Comments closed

King Crimson – Heroes (Live in Europe 2016) – EP (2017) [Official Digital Download 24bit/48kHz]

King Crimson – Heroes (Live in Europe 2016) – EP (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/48 kHz | Time – 26:26 minutes | 311 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

DGM and Panegyric are proud to present King Crimson’s Heroes EP – recorded live on the European tour of 2016. The title track sees Robert Fripp reprise the unforgettable guitar role he created for the original David Bowie studio recording in the same city in 1977, particularly poignant in the year of Bowie’s death. Also featured on the EP are a ten minutes recording of Easy Money (Paris), a song that varies in length and solos from night to night and is always a fan favourite, an edited version (featuring the “song section”) of Crim Classic Starless often a set closer, always a stand-out moment and a recording of the three drummers’ showpiece The Hell Hounds of Krim (both from Vienna) – all previously unreleased live recordings.

The EP is completed with a ‘radio edit’ of Heroes.

A full live album, recorded on the 2016 European tour will be issued in September 2017.

Comments closed

King Crimson – Discipline (1981/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – Discipline (1981/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:01:12 minutes | 649 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

When King Crimson leader Robert Fripp decided to assemble a new version of the band in the early ’80s, prog rock fans rejoiced, and most new wave fans frowned. But after hearing this new unit’s first release, 1981’s Discipline, all the elements that made other arty new wave rockers (i.e., Talking Heads, Pere Ubu, the Police, etc.) successful were evident. Combining the futuristic guitar of Adrian Belew with the textured guitar of Fripp doesn’t sound like it would work on paper, but the pairing of these two originals worked out magically. Rounding out the quartet was bass wizard Tony Levin and ex-Yes drummer Bill Bruford. Belew’s vocals fit the music perfectly, sounding like David Byrne at his most paranoid at times (the funk track “Thela Hun Ginjeet”). Some other highlights include Tony Levin’s “stick” (a strange bass-like instrument)-driven opener “Elephant Talk,” the atmospheric “The Sheltering Sky,” and the heavy rocker “Indiscipline.” Many Crimson fans consider this album one of their best, right up there with In the Court of the Crimson King. It’s easy to understand why after you hear the inspired performances by this hungry new version of the band.

Comments closed

King Crimson – Beat (1982/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

King Crimson – Beat (1982/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 49:51 minutes | 541 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Discipline Global Mobile

Beat is not as good as its predecessor (1981’s Discipline), but it’s not too shabby, either. The ’80s version of King Crimson (Robert Fripp, guitar; Adrian Belew, vocals/guitar; Tony Levin, bass; and Bill Bruford, drums) retains the then-modern new wave sound introduced on Discipline. The band’s performances are still inspired, but the songwriting isn’t as catchy or strong. The moody love song “Heartbeat” has become a concert favorite for the band, and contains a Jimi Hendrix-like backward guitar solo. Other worthwhile tracks include “Waiting Man,” which features world music sounds (thanks to some stunning bass/percussion interplay), and “Neurotica” does an excellent job of painting an unwavering picture of a large U.S. city, with its jerky rhythms and tense vocals. With lots of different guitar textures, bass explorations, and uncommon drum rhythms present, King Crimson’s Beat will automatically appeal to other musicians. But since they’re fantastic songwriters as well, you don’t have to be a virtuoso to feel the passion of their music.

Comments closed
%d bloggers like this: