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Tag: Itzhak Perlman

Itzhak Perlman, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, John Williams – Cinema Serenade (1997) [Reissue 2015] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Itzhak Perlman, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, John Williams – Cinema Serenade (1997) [Reissue 2015]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 53:32 minutes | Scans included | 777 MB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/44,1 kHz | Full Scans included | 514 MB

Cinema Serenade came to be as a result of the 1992 collaboration of the world’s premier film composer, John Williams, with one of the world’s finest violinists, Itzhak Perlman, on the score for Steven Spielberg’s Holocaust epic Schindler’s List. The duo reunited to create a collection of excerpts from a variety of different film scores presented in new arrangements that are centered around Perlman’s violin. Williams arranged most of the numbers and conducted the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. The selections are a strange hodgepodge culled haphazardly from some 50 years of film history. As you might expect, the theme from Schindler’s List is included. And it’s not surprising to find Oscar honored scores like Out of Africa (John Barry) or Il Postino (Luis Bacalov), The Age of Innocence (Elmer Bernstein) and The Color Purple (Quincy Jones, Jeremy Lubbock, Rodney Templeton, Jeff Rosenbaum). But some of the other selections are less predictable. There are songs from musical comedies (“Papa Can You Hear From Me?” from Yentl, “I Will Wait for You” from The Umbrellas of Cherbourg). There is a Carlos Gardel tango that was used briefly in Scent of a Woman, but was not composed for a film. Most rewardingly, there are some memorable musical selections from the oft-neglected realm of foreign film. In addition to Bacalov’s theme from Il Postino, a beautifully sentimental melody with tango-like flourishes, there are excerpts from Luis Bonfa’s Black Orpheus, Andrea Morricone’s Cinema Paradiso, and Andre Previn’s Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Perlman’s gorgeous solos add breadth and scope to nearly all of the compositions, demonstrating that they work as well in the concert hall as they did in the movie theater. The only real lightweight pieces included were both composed by Williams himself. Far and Away and Sabrina are hardly the brightest points in Williams’ career; the scores were nearly as forgettable as the films themselves. (The latter did receive an Oscar nomination for best musical or comedy score, but it never would have been selected if anyone else had written it.) But fans of film music will generally be pleased by this collection, and in some cases may prefer the Perlman versions to the originals.

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Berliner Philharmoniker – Itzhak Perlman and Daniel Barenboim perform Beethoven’s Violin Concerto 1992 720p WEB-DL AAC2.0 H.264-CHDWEB

Daniel Barenboim and Itzhak Perlman have been friends and colleagues for practically all of their lives. In the spring of 1992 they gave four concerts with the Berliner Philharmoniker in the Schauspielhaus am Gendarmenmarkt, while the orchestra’s usual home was being renovated. Central to the two programmes that were presented twice within a week were the violin concertos of Beethoven and Brahms. In both cases the programme was rounded out by other, lesser-known works. On the first two evenings, Liszt’s rarely played Dante Symphony provided a delightful contrast to Beethoven’s repertory classic in D major.

Beethoven first toyed with the idea of writing a violin concerto around 1790, towards the end of his years in Bonn. And in the wake of his two Romances for violin and orchestra, which may be regarded as preliminary studies for the concerto, he completed his only violin concerto in 1806. Now regarded as a milestone in the history of the violin repertory, it was not a success when premiered by Franz Clement in Vienna on 23 December 1806. Observers felt that it contained “a host of ideas that do not belong together and that are piled up on top of each other”. Time did not yet look favourably on a work that is elaborated along symphonic lines. Not until 1844, when the twelve-year-old violin prodigy Joseph Joachim – later one of Brahms’s closest friends – gave his acclaimed London debut and scored a great personal success with the work did it embark on its triumphal journey through the concert halls of the world.

These concerts in Berlin in 1992 marked the twentieth anniversary of American violinist Itzhak Perlman’s debut with the Berliner Philharmoniker – he had first appeared with the orchestra in 1972, performing Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto, also under Barenboim’s direction. In comparison to those of Tchaikovsky’s late Romantic masterpiece, the difficulties of Beethoven’s concerto lie – in Perlman’s view – chiefly in the transparency of the orchestral writing: “There’s nowhere to hide.” For Perlman, it is “a great, great piece” which he “could play forever, 10 times in a row, and never get tired of it. Because every time I play it, there’s something new to discover in this piece.”

https://www.digitalconcerthall.com/en/concert/51723

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Itzhak Perlman – The Complete Warner Recordings 1972 -1980 (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Itzhak Perlman – The Complete Warner Recordings 1972 -1980 (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 24:09:59 minutes | 26,7 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Warner Classics

To celebrate Perlman’s landmark birthday, in September 2015 Warner Classics is releasing Itzhak Perlman — The Complete Warner Recordings, a fifty-nine-album set which contains all the recordings he made for EMI Classics (his principal label) and also for Teldec — including some previously unreleased recordings. The Deluxe Edition covers every aspect of Perlman’s art, containing concertos — both the “essential” concertos and a number of more rarely-heard works, including Perlman’s own commissions from living composers — other pieces for violin and orchestra, chamber music, recital and crossover repertoire (including jazz, ragtime and klezmer), and even a disc that focuses on Perlman as narrator and (briefly) opera singer.

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Itzhak Perlman, Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot – Eternal Echoes: Songs and Dances for the Soul (2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Itzhak Perlman, Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot – Eternal Echoes: Songs and Dances for the Soul (2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 58:36 minutes | 637 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Booklet, Front Cover | © Sony Classical

Itzhak Perlman’s soulful tone and virtuosic technique along with Cantor Helfgot’s spellbinding tenor meld perfectly together on a new album of beloved liturgical and traditional works. While rooted in the cantorial-liturgical tradition of Jewish music, the ten tracks on Eternal Echoes encompass a wide range of musical moods.

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Henri Vieuxtemps – Violin Concertos Nos. 4 & 5 – Itzhak Perlman, Orchestre de Paris, Daniel Barenboim (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Henri Vieuxtemps – Violin Concertos Nos. 4 & 5 – Itzhak Perlman, Orchestre de Paris, Daniel Barenboim (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 00:51:11 minutes | 958 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download  – Source: Q0buz | Booklet, Front Cover | © Warner Classics
Recorded: Salle Wagram, Paris, 7, 9 & 10 February 1976 (Op.31); 10 February 1976 & 30 June 1977 (Op.37)

A successor to Paganini, Henri Vieuxtemps was, in company with Sarasate and Wieniawski, one of the great violin virtuosos of the nineteenth century. These performer-composers have often been accused of possessing an overly showy style, too centred on their own capabilities and inclined to alternate between speed and sentimentality. While it is true that most of their works were written to showcase their own instrumental skills, highlighting a number of technical innovations in the process, it would be unfair to dismiss their music as nothing but spectacular effects and languorous melodies. By skilfully blending a knowledge of the legacy bequeathed to them by their predecessors and a fondness for their respective national folk traditions, Sarasate, Vieuxtemps and Wieniawski all in their own ways succeeded in continuing the virtuoso tradition of expansive passion and exaltation.

It was as a violinist that Vieuxtemps (1820–81) initially made his name, notably in Paris, where he received unanimous acclaim. Berlioz, for example, offered the following words of praise: “M. Vieuxtemps is a violinist whose talent is prodigious, in the strictest sense of the word. He does things I have never heard attempted by anyone else. He braves perils that terrify the listener but do not alarm him in the least, so sure is he of emerging from the ordeal safe and sound.” Appointed Professor of violin at the St Petersburg Conservatory, Vieuxtemps was to have a considerable influence on the development of the instrument in Russia. He then took on the same role at the Brussels Conservatory, where his pupils included Eugène Ysaÿe, Jeno˝ Hubay and Émile Sauret.
As a composer, this leading figure of the Franco-Belgian violin tradition wrote a considerable number of works for his own instrument, including seven concertos and around fifty virtuoso pieces. Of the former, the Fourth and Fifth still form part of the standard repertoire today, and both have been recorded many times. It was with the Fourth, a vast “symphony with principal violin” (Berlioz), that Vieuxtemps really established his composing credentials, Tchaikovsky deeming it “beautiful, poetic, very well conceived and finely orchestrated”.

The Fifth, nicknamed “Grétry” because its slow movement features a quotation from that composer’s opera Lucile, remains the most frequently performed of the two. On first hearing it, Berlioz again responded with enthusiasm: “If Vieuxtemps were not such a great virtuoso, we should acclaim him as a great composer … This concerto is a masterpiece whose melodic style is noble and dignified throughout, and whose rich harmony is constantly accentuated by the excellent and finely coloured instrumental writing.” The fact that such stars of the twentieth-century violin world as Jascha Heifetz, Leonid Kogan, Yehudi Menuhin, Arthur Grumiaux and Isaac Stern chose to commit their versions to disc is proof, if proof were needed, of the seductive qualities of these two concertos. Itzhak Perlman’s own recording — authentic and flamboyant — follows in their footsteps and is a worthy addition to his exploration of the virtuoso repertoire. –Jean-Michel Molkhou

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Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto & Serenade melancolique – Itzhak Perlman, Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto & Serenade melancolique – Itzhak Perlman, Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 46:48 minutes | 836 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Q0buz | Digital Booklet | © Warner Classics
Recorded: The “Old Met”, Philadelphia, 11 & 13 November 1978

It has to be the most popular violin concerto of all — by turns captivating, moving and flamboyant. Almost every virtuoso has recorded it at least once. And it was with this work that an eighteen-year-old violinist by the name of Itzhak Perlman would make the very first recording of his career, with the London Symphony Orchestra and Alfred Wallenstein (1964), returning to the studio in the years to come to set down three further versions of the same concerto. We are, of course, talking about Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D major, Op.35. Between the recording he made with the Boston Symphony conducted by Erich Leinsdorf (RCA, 1967), and his live version with the Israel Philharmonic and Zubin Mehta in Leningrad (EMI, 1990; see volume 45), Perlman added this third interpretation to his recorded catalogue. This concerto more than any other has accompanied him throughout his career. Indeed, he’s often claimed that he could play it virtually in his sleep. It could even be seen as emblematic of his style, given both the prodigiously virtuosic demands it makes on the performer and its charismatic warmth.

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Scott Joplin – The Easy Winners & Other Rags – Itzhak Perlman, Andre Previn (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Scott Joplin – The Easy Winners & Other Rags – Itzhak Perlman, Andre Previn (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 43:10 minutes | 771 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Q0buz | Digital Booklet | ©  Warner Classics
Recorded: Abbey Road Studios, London, 2 & 10 December 1974

This album of ragtimes by Scott Joplin, recorded in 1974, was Itzhak Perlman’s first foray beyond the classical repertory, at least on record. The departure proved a successful one and was to be the first of many other such adventures, which also included jazz with André Previn (volume 24) and Oscar Peterson, recordings of Yiddish folk music (volume 38) and film music. In the tradition of his great predecessors, foremost among them Fritz Kreisler and Jascha Heifetz, Perlman supplied the arrangement for violin and piano himself, remaining faithful to the composer’s style while exploiting the classical violin’s rich palette of colours. His partnership with André Previn, who accompanied him on the piano, always retained a classical perspective, while still allowing for a measure of stylistic freedom.

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Henryk Wieniawski – Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 – Itzhak Perlman, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Henryk Wieniawski – Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 – Itzhak Perlman, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 00:50:18 minutes | 0,99 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: Q0buz | Artwork: Digital Booklet | © Warner Classics
Recorded: Abbey Road Studios, London, 1 & 2 November 1971

Not only was Henryk Wieniawski one of the most brilliant violinists of the nineteenth century, he was also one of the first “modern” virtuosos not to limit his repertoire to his own works but to introduce audiences to music by such greats as Bach and Beethoven. Polish by birth, he was educated in Paris, studying the violin principally with Lambert Massart (Wieniawski won first prize in the violin at the age of eleven, making him the Conservatoire’s youngest-ever graduate) and composition with Hippolyte Collet. He was still only eighteen when he published his First Violin Concerto, which was a triumph at its premiere in Leipzig in 1853. He became renowned across Europe, admired for his dazzling artistry, both on the violin as a soloist and on the viola in chamber music — notably in concerts organised by the Beethoven Quartet Society while he was in London in 1859.

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Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Piano Trio – Vladimir Ashkenazy, Itzhak Perlman, Lynn Harrell (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Piano Trio – Vladimir Ashkenazy, Itzhak Perlman, Lynn Harrell (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz  | Time – 00:49:17 minutes | 904 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Q0buz | Digital Booklet | © Warner Classics
Recorded: CBS Studios, New York, 24–26 January 1980

Throughout his recording career, Itzhak Perlman has shown a real attraction for the trio repertoire. Following the lead of such eminent predecessors as Jascha Heifetz, David Oistrakh and Isaac Stern, he has formed lasting chamber relationships with other, equally talented musicians. He recorded the major works of the trio repertoire for EMI with Russian-born pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy and American cellist Lynn Harrell – notably the works of Beethoven and Brahms. In later years they also recorded the Ravel Trio (this time for Decca), while Perlman also added the two Mendelssohn trios to his discography, on that occasion working with Emanuel Ax and Yo-Yo Ma (for Sony). The first album released by Perlman, Ashkenazy and Harrell was devoted to the Tchaikovsky Piano Trio, a work well served by the recording industry, having been immortalised in the 1950s by three legendary versions laid down by the Oistrakh Trio, the grouping of Kogan, Gilels and Rostropovich, and the famous “million-dollar trio” of Heifetz, Rubinstein and Piatigorsky respectively (Zukerman, Barenboim and Du Pré later joined forces and recorded an impassioned live version for EMI in 1972). Tchaikovsky composed the work in homage to his late friend the pianist-composer Nikolai Rubinstein, brother of Anton. He had gone to see Rubinstein’s body, after his funeral service, and in the Trio expressed a sense of death’s physical, haunting presence and a genuine, scarcely bearable terror, which he was to develop further in The Queen of Spades. Although he had often condemned the very form of the piano trio, arguing that his “ears would not accept the combination of piano, violin and cello”, and even writing that he found it “real torture to listen to a trio or a sonata with violin or cello”, it somehow came to be the natural choice for this memorial on a grand scale. The piano symbolised the now-silenced voice of Rubinstein, the violin and cello those of his old friends, Tchaikovsky himself and his patroness Madame von Meck. A work of tact and restraint, free from any excess of sentiment, the Trio, Op.50 “to the memory of a great artist” remained in manuscript form for over a year before the composer agreed to its publication in 1883, thereby allowing it to take its place among the masterpieces of the genre. –Jean-Michel Molkhou

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Sibelius: Violin Concerto; Sinding: Suite – Itzhak Perlman, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Andre Previn (2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96Hz]

Sibelius: Violin Concerto; Sinding: Suite – Itzhak Perlman, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Andre Previn (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96kHz  | Time – 00:45:03 minutes | 830 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Q0vuz | Front Cover | © Warner Classics
Recorded: Heinz Hall, Pittsburgh, USA, 23 & 24 February 1979

Jascha Heifetz (1901–1987), whose style and repertoire exerted a decisive influence on most twentieth-century violinists, had an insatiable curiosity for discovering and rehabilitating long-forgotten works. We have Heifetz to thank for having dusted off, and made the first recordings of, Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy and Second Violin Concerto (see volumes 14 and 40), the concertos by Korngold and Conus (volume 27), and the two works featured here. He was also a key source of inspiration to the young Itzhak Perlman, who had not even turned twenty when he made his first recording of Sibelius’s Concerto in D minor (1966, RCA). Thirteen years later, he returned to the work for EMI, this time coupling it to great effect with the Suite in A minor by Christian Sinding, thereby paying tribute to a little-known composer who, alongside Grieg and Sibelius, was in fact one of the most authentic Scandinavian composers of his day.

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