Grateful Dead – May 1977: Get Shown The Light (2017) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Grateful Dead – May 1977: Get Shown The Light (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | 20,9 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Grateful Dead – Rhino

Four Complete Shows on 11 discs
Four folios housed in a slipcase
5/5/77 Veterans Memorial Coliseum: New Haven, CT
5/7/77 Boston Garden: Boston, MA
5/8/77 Barton Hall, Cornell University: Ithaca, NY
5/9/77 Buffalo Memorial Auditorium: Buffalo, NY
50-page book of liners and photographs
Sourced from the Betty Cantor-Jackson soundboard recordings, transferred by Plangent Processes
Mastered in HDCD by Jeffrey Norman
Artwork by Grammy-winning graphic artist Masaki Koike
Release Date: May 5, 2017
WHAT DEAD HEADS HAVE BEEN SAYING ABOUT…

NEW HAVEN 5/5/77
“Here is a prime example of the saying ‘the whole is greater than the sum of the parts’ … It’s called synergy and the Dead wrote the book on it.”

BOSTON 5/7/77
“The music they laid down brought me places I had not been before.”

CORNELL 5/8/77
“…the single best rock performance anywhere, anytime, by anyone.”

“There was just some kind of magical connection this night between the band members and the band and the audience – some texture, or some type of cosmic or celestial force is in the room.”

“This show is, was, and always will be Mecca.”

BUFFALO 5/9/77
“…an awesome display of the Dead’s captivating power” Continue reading

Grateful Dead – Pacific Northwest ’73-’74: Believe it If You Need It (Live) (2018) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Grateful Dead – Pacific Northwest ’73-’74: Believe it If You Need It (Live) (2018)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz  | Time – 03:54:16 minutes | 6,93 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Digital Booklet, Front Cover | © Grateful Dead – Rhino

During the Grateful Dead’s legendary 30-year run, the band often visited its northern neighbours in Portland, Seattle, and less-than-often Vancouver. Even so, official live recordings from those cities are something of a rarity. Pacific Northwest ’73-’74: Believe It If You Need It highlights some of the best performances from Grateful Dead’s time in the northwest. The concerts in the set include: P.N.E. Coliseum, Vancouver, B.C. (6/22/73); Portland Memorial Coliseum, Portland, OR (6/24/73); P.N.E. Coliseum, Vancouver, Canada (5/17/74); Portland Memorial Coliseum, Portland, OR (5/19/74); and Hec Edmundson Pavilion, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (5/21/74). During the period when the shows were recorded, the Grateful Dead included: Jerry Garcia, Donna Jean Godchaux, Keith Godchaux, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh and Bob Weir. The recordings of the 1973 shows were made just a few months before the band released its sixth studio album, Wake of the Flood, which was its first without founding member Ron “Pigpen” McKernan, who died in March 1973, and the first on their new Grateful Dead Records label. The 1974 shows were recorded just a few weeks before the band released its seventh studio album, From The Mars Hotel. Each show was mastered in 24bit high-resolution audio from the original master tapes by Jeffrey Norman at Mockingbird Mastering. The transfers from the masters were transferred and restored by Plangent Processes, further ensuring that this is the best, most authentic that these shows have ever sounded. Continue reading

Grateful Dead – American Beauty (2001) [DVD-Audio ISO]

Grateful Dead – American Beauty
Artist: Grateful Dead | Album: American Beauty | Style: Country Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Classic Rock | Year: 2001 [1970 original] | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, MLP 2.0 96kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1 48kHz/16Bit) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 10 | Size: ~4.27 Gb |  Covers: only front | Release: Warner Bros. Records/Rhino Records (R2 74385), 2001 | Note: Watermarked

With 1970’s Workingman’s Dead, the Grateful Dead went through an overnight metamorphosis, turning abruptly from tripped-out free-form rock toward sublime acoustic folk and Americana. Taking notes on vocal harmonies from friends Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Dead used the softer statements of their fourth studio album as a subtle but moving reflection on the turmoil, heaviness, and hope America’s youth was facing as the idealistic ’60s ended. American Beauty was recorded just a few months after its predecessor, both expanding and improving on the bluegrass, folk, and psychedelic country explorations of Workingman’s Dead with some of the band’s most brilliant compositions. The songs here have a noticeably more relaxed and joyous feel. Having dived headfirst into this new sound with the previous album, the bandmembers found the summit of their collaborative powers here, with lyricist Robert Hunter penning some of his most poetic work, Jerry Garcia focusing more on gliding pedal steel than his regular electric lead guitar work, and standout lead vocal performances coming from Bob Weir (on the anthem to hippie love “Sugar Magnolia”), Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (on the husky blues of “Operator”), and Phil Lesh (on the near-perfect opening tune, “Box of Rain”). This album also marked the beginning of what would become a long musical friendship between Garcia and Dave Grisman, whose mandolin playing adds depth and flavor to tracks like the outlaw country-folk of “Friend of the Devil” and the gorgeously devotional “Ripple.” American Beauty eventually spawned the band’s highest charting single — “Truckin’,” the greasy blues-rock tribute to nomadic counterculture — but it also contained some of their most spiritual and open-hearted sentiments ever, their newfound love of intricate vocal arrangements finding pristine expression on the lamenting “Brokedown Palace” and the heavenly nostalgia and gratitude of “Attics of My Life.” While the Dead eventually amassed a following so devoted that following the band from city to city became the center of many people’s lives, the majority of the band’s magic came in the boundless heights it reached in its live sets but rarely managed to capture in the studio setting. American Beauty is a categorical exception to this, offering a look at the Dead transcending even their own exploratory heights and making some of their most powerful music by examining their most gentle and restrained impulses. It’s easily the masterwork of their studio output, and a strong contender for the best music the band ever made, even including the countless hours of live shows captured on tape in the decades that followed. Continue reading

Grateful Dead – Complete Studio Albums Collection: 1967-1989 (2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Grateful Dead – Complete Studio Albums Collection (2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 521:14 minutes | 10,4 GB
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | Front covers
13 Studio albums: 1967-89 > Newest re-mastering from the Original master tapes

This new hi-res collection of the Grateful Dead’s studio work has been painstakingly produced from the original master tapes of each album, using their original mixes to produce a work that is truer to the original sound than any previous release. Included in this collection are the band’s 13 studio albums, spanning three decades and containing over 8 hours of music, lovingly rendered in hi-resolution…

The Complete Studio Albums Collection contains all 13 of Grateful Dead’s studio albums. Drawing from the 1960s, the bundle features the group’s gold-certified self-titled debut; Anthem of the Sun, which is the first with drummer Mickey Hart; and Aoxomoxoa, which boasts the live staple “St. Stephen.” Music from the 1970s includes: the back-to-back platinum releases Workingman’s Dead and American Beauty; Wake Of The Flood, the first with keyboardist Keith Godchaux who replaced founding member Ron “Pigpen” McKernan; From the Mars Hotel, which features the debut of “Scarlet Begonias”; Blues For Allah with the standout track “Franklin’s Tower”; and two gold albums in a row, Terrapin Station and Shakedown Street. The 1980s are represented by: Go To Heaven, the first with keyboardist Brent Mydland; the double-platinum In The Dark; and the group’s final studio album, Built To Last, which debuted on Halloween 1989. Continue reading

Grateful Dead – Pacific Northwest ’73-’74: The Complete Recordings (2018) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Grateful Dead – Pacific Northwest ’73-’74: The Complete Recordings (2018)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz  | Time – 20:19:28 minutes | 41,7 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © Grateful Dead Productions

The Pacific Northwest offers up a rich feast of land, sky, and water. It is ripe with influences, abundant with symbols, deep and spirited. It should, therefore, come as no surprise that the Grateful Dead played some of their most inspired shows on these fertile grounds. It does, however, sometimes take a breath for the elements to re-align years later. It seems for us, they finally have and we are able to present not just a glimpse of the band’s extraordinary exploratory tour through the region, but a two-tour bounty as the PACIFIC NORTHWEST ’73-’74: THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS.

For PACIFIC NORTHWEST ’73-’74: THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS, we’ve paired two short runs made up of six previously unreleased shows – P.N.E. Coliseum, Vancouver, B.C. (6/22/73); Portland Memorial Coliseum, Portland, OR (6/24/73); Seattle Center Arena, Seattle, WA (6/26/73); P.N.E. Coliseum, Vancouver, Canada (5/17/74); Portland Memorial Coliseum, Portland, OR (5/19/74); and Hec Edmundson Pavilion, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (5/21/74). Each show has been mastered in HDCD from the original master tapes by Jeffrey Norman at Mockingbird Mastering. The transfers from the masters were transferred and restored by Plangent Processes, further ensuring that this is the best, most authentic that these shows have ever sounded.

PACIFIC NORTHWEST ’73-’74: THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS comes in an ornate box created by Canada’s preeminent First Nations artist Roy Henry Vickers (more on this tremendous artist soon). To complement the music, the set also includes a 64-page book with an in-depth essay by Grateful Dead scholar Nicholas G. Meriwether and photos by Richie Pechner.

Continue reading