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Tag: Deep Purple

Deep Purple – Concerto for Group and Orchestra (2003) [DVD-AUDIO ISO]

Deep Purple – Concerto for Group and Orchestra
Artist: Deep Purple | Composer: Jon Lord | Album: Concerto for Group and Orchestra | Style: Rock, Classical | Year: 2003 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 48kHz/24Bit, MLP 2.0 48kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1 48kHz/24Bit) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 10 | Size: 7.87 Gb | Recovery: 3% | Covers: in archive | Release: Rhino (R9 73927), 2003 | Note: Watermarked

Back in 1970, it seemed as though any British group that could was starting to utilize classical elements in their work — for some, like ELP, that meant quoting from the classics as often and loudly as possible, while for others, like Yes, it meant incorporating classical structures into their albums and songs. Deep Purple, at the behest of keyboardman Jon Lord, fell briefly into the camp of this offshoot of early progressive rock with the Concerto for Group and Orchestra. For most fans, the album represented the nadir of the classic (i.e., post-Rod Evans) group: minutes of orchestral meandering lead into some perfectly good hard rock jamming by the band, but the trip is almost not worth the effort. Ritchie Blackmore sounds great and plays his heart out, and you can tell this band is going to go somewhere, just by virtue of the energy that they put into these extended pieces. The classical influences mostly seem drawn from movie music composers Dimitri Tiomkin and Franz Waxman (and Elmer Bernstein), with some nods to Rachmaninoff, Sibelius, and Mahler, and they rather just lay there. Buried in the middle of the second movement is a perfectly good song, but you’ve got to get to it through eight minutes of orchestral noodling on either side. The third movement is almost bracing enough to make up for the flaws of the other two, though by itself, it wouldn’t make the album worthwhile — Pink Floyd proved far more adept at mixing group and orchestra, and making long, slow, lugubrious pieces interesting. As a bonus, however, the producers have added a pair of hard rock numbers by the group alone, “Wring That Neck” and “Child in Time,” that were played at the same concert. They and the third movement of the established piece make this worth a listen.

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Deep Purple – Johnny’s Band EP (2017) [Official Digital Download 24bit/48kHz]

Deep Purple – Johnny’s Band EP (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/48 kHz | Time – 24:03 minutes | 300 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © earMUSIC

CD pressing of the third single from the album infinite. ‘Johnny’s Band’ follows the singles “Time For Bedlam” and “All I Got Is You”. The song is an affectionate portrait of a fictional band that quickly gain success and enjoy every side that comes with it. As often happens, Johnny’s Band can´t help but lose it, and break up, only to find out later that the pleasure still to be performing live is all that matters, even when the hype, the success and the glory have long vanished. As special bonus treats, the single includes four previously unreleased songs. Starting with the rehearsal recording by no other than Roger Glover, the “In & Out Jam” gives fans a glimpse behind the scenes of the album recordings. On top, the EP is peppered with three amazing and previously unreleased live versions. “Strange Kind Of Woman”, “The Mule” and “Hell To Pay” were recorded on the successful NOW What?! world tour in Gaevle, Sweden on August 10th, 2013 and are, just like the rehearsal recording, only available on this EP.

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Deep Purple – inFinite (2017) [Official Digital Download 24bit/48kHz]

Deep Purple – inFinite (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/48 kHz | Time – 45:44 minutes | 589 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | Booklet, Front Cover | © earMUSIC
Recorded: 2016

Infinite is the 20th studio album by English rock band Deep Purple, released on 7 April 2017. The track “Time for Bedlam” was released via YouTube and Spotify on 14 December 2016 and “All I Got Is You” followed on 10 March 2017.

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Deep Purple – The Infinite Live Recordings Vol.1 (2017) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Deep Purple – The Infinite Live Recordings Vol.1 (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 1:30:01 minutes | 912 MB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download |  Front Cover | © earMUSIC

Live album from the British hard rock icons. This set was recorded at Hellfest 2017, the biggest metal festival in France. Thousands of fans assembled to witness this very special performance. This Deep Purple live album contains a brand new previously unreleased 80min live performance.

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Deep Purple – Made In Japan (1972/2014) [High Fidelity Pure Audio Blu-Ray Disc



Genre: Hard Rock
Duration: 2:32:30

Quality: Blu-ray Disc
Container: BDMV
Video Codec: MPEG-4 AVC
Audio Codec: LPCM | DTS-HD Master Audio | Dolby TrueHD

A Rolling Stone magazine readers poll in 2012 voted “Made In Japan” as the sixth greatest live album of all time. Together with Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, Deep Purple have been referred to as the “unholy trinity of British hard rock and heavy metal”. 2014 see’s Made in Japan newly remastered and released in a number of special formats.

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Deep Purple – Shades of Deep Purple (1968/2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Deep Purple – Shades of Deep Purple (1968/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:42:45 minutes | 996 MB | Genre: Rock, Hard Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Parlophone Records
Recorded: May 11 – 13 1968 at Pye Studios, London.

The usual perception of early Deep Purple is that it was a band with a lot of potential in search of a direction. And that might be true of their debut LP, put together in three days of sessions in May of 1968, but it’s still a hell of an album. From the opening bars of “And the Address,” it’s clear that they’d gotten down the fundamentals of heavy metal from day one, and at various points the electricity and the beat just surge forth in ways that were startlingly new in the summer of 1968. Ritchie Blackmore never sounded less at ease as a guitarist than he does on this album, and the sound mix doesn’t exactly favor the heavier side of his playing, but the rhythm section of Nick Simper and Ian Paice rumble forward, and Jon Lord’s organ flourishes, weaving classical riffs, and unexpected arabesques into “I’m So Glad,” which sounds rather majestic here. “Hush” was the number that most people knew at the time (it was a hit single in America), and it is a smooth, crunchy interpretation of the Joe South song. But nobody could have been disappointed with the rest of this record — one can even hear the very distant origins of “Smoke on the Water” in “Mandrake Root,” once one gets past the similarities to Jimi Hendrix’s “Foxy Lady”; by the song’s extended finale, they sound more like the Nice. Their version of “Help” is one of the more interesting reinterpretations of a Beatles song, as a slow, rough-textured dirge. “Hey Joe” is a bit overblown, and the group clearly had to work a bit at both songwriting and their presentation, but one key attribute that runs through most of this record — even more so than the very pronounced heaviness of the playing — is a spirit of fun; these guys are obviously having the time of their lives rushing through their limited repertoire, and it’s infectious to the listener; it gives this record much more of a ’60s feel than we’re accustomed to hearing from this band. –Bruce Eder

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Deep Purple – Deep Purple (1969/2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Deep Purple – Deep Purple (1969/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:44:20 minutes | 0,97 GB | Genre: Rock, Hard Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Parlophone Records
Recorded: January to March 1969 at De Lane Lea Studios, London.

This is a record that even those who aren’t Deep Purple fans can listen to two or three times in one sitting — but then, this wasn’t much like any other album that the group ever issued. Actually, Deep Purple was highly prized for many years by fans of progressive rock, and for good reason. The group was going through a transition — original lead singer Rod Evans and bassist Nick Simper would be voted out of the lineup soon after the album was finished (although they weren’t told about it until three months later), organist Jon Lord and guitarist Ritchie Blackmore having perceived limitations in their work in terms of where each wanted to take the band. And between Lord’s ever-greater ambitions toward fusing classical and rock and Blackmore’s ever-bolder guitar attack, both of which began to coalesce with the session for Deep Purple in early 1969, the group managed to create an LP that combined heavy metal’s early, raw excitement, intensity, and boldness with progressive rock’s complexity and intellectual scope, and virtuosity on both levels. On “The Painter,” “Why Didn’t Rosemary?,” and, especially, “Bird Has Flown,” they strike a spellbinding balance between all of those elements, and Evans’ work on the latter is one of the landmark vocal performances in progressive rock. “April,” a three-part suite with orchestral accompaniment, is overall a match for such similar efforts by the Nice as the “Five Bridges Suite,” and gets extra points for crediting its audience with the patience for a relatively long, moody developmental section and for including a serious orchestral interlude that does more than feature a pretty tune, exploiting the timbre of various instruments as well as the characteristics of the full ensemble. Additionally, the band turns in a very successful stripped-down, hard rock version of Donovan’s “Lalena,” with an organ break that shows Lord’s debt to modern jazz as well as classical training. In all, amid all of those elements — the orchestral accompaniment, harpsichord embellishments, and backward organ and drum tracks — Deep Purple holds together astonishingly well as a great body of music. This is one of the most bracing progressive rock albums ever, and a successful vision of a musical path that the group might have taken but didn’t. Ironically, the group’s American label, Tetragrammaton Records, which was rapidly approaching bankruptcy, released this album a lot sooner than EMI did in England, but ran into trouble over the use of the Hieronymus Bosch painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights” on the cover; although it has been on display at the Vatican, the work was wrongly perceived as containing profane images and never stocked as widely in stores as it might’ve been. –Bruce Eder

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Deep Purple – The Book of Taliesyn (1968/2015) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Deep Purple – The Book of Taliesyn (1968/2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz  | Time – 00:43:56 minutes | 985 MB | Genre: Rock, Hard Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: Qobuz | © Parlophone Records
Recorded: De Lane Lea Studios, Kingsway, London, August and October 1968

Several months after the innovative remake of “You Keep Me Hanging On,” England’s answer to Vanilla Fudge, was this early version of Deep Purple, which featured vocalist Rod Evans, and bassist Nick Simper, along with mainstays Ritchie Blackmore, Jon Lord, and Ian Paice. This, their second album, followed on the heels of “Hush,” a dynamic arrangement of a Joe South tune, far removed from the flavor of one of his own hits, “Walk a Mile in My Shoes.” Four months later, this album’s cover of Neil Diamond’s Top 25, 1967 gem “Kentucky Woman,” went Top 40 for Deep Purple. Also like Vanilla Fudge, the group’s own originals were creative, thought-provoking, but not nearly as interesting as their take on cover tunes. Vanilla Fudge did “Eleanor Rigby,” and Deep Purple respond by going inside “We Can Work It Out” — it falls out of nowhere after the progressive rock jam “Exposition,” Ritchie Blackmore’s leads zipping in between Rod Evans smooth and precise vocals. As Vanilla Fudge was progressively leaning more towards psychedelia, here Deep Purple are the opposite. The boys claim to be inspired by the Bard of King Arthur’s court in Camelot, Taliesyn. John Vernon Lord, under the art direction of Les Weisbrich, paints a superb wonderland on the album jacket, equal to the madness of Hieronymous Bosch’s cover painting used for the third album. Originals “The Shield” and “Anthem” make early Syd Barrett Pink Floyd appear punk in comparison. Novel sounds are aided by Lord’s dominating keyboards, a signature of this group.

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Deep Purple – Live On The BBC (1972) [Audio Fidelity 2004] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Deep Purple – Live On The BBC (1972) [Audio Fidelity 2004]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 89:54 minutes | Scans included | 3,62 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,78 GB
Audio Fidelity SACD #AFZ-017 | Mastered for SACD by Steve Hoffman

Recorded by the BBC on March 9, 1972, this previously difficult to find live show captures the classic Mark ll version of Deep Purple in all their incendiary power. This performance — basically the entirety of the then just released Machine Head minus “Pictures of Home” — is easily as good, and at times better than, Made in Japan, recorded five months later. The band apparently felt the Japan tapes were of inferior quality, and initially did not want them released, which makes this arguably the most potent document of the group’s live show from that year. Although this SACD hybrid adds studio versions of “Hush” and “River Deep Mountain High” from the Mark l edition to flesh out the playing time, one of the live tracks, their version of Little Richard’s “Lucille,” is only available on the SACD layer. That means that anyone without an SACD player won’t be able to hear it, but will be able to play the two studio tracks, a perplexing decision that is unexplained in the liner notes. In any event, the live BBC tapes find Purple slamming through these songs like they had something to prove. Although “Child in Time” is MIA, it is replaced by “Maybe I’m a Leo” and “Never Before,” two tracks that didn’t make the Japan set list. Even without those additions, this is a find for all Deep Purple fans, and a great place for all classic rock fans to jump in. Since this release is from an audiophile label, great care was spent making sure the sound is as crisp as possible from tapes this old, and the work has paid off. Those with SACD equipment get to hear “Lucille” and also experience the band in a wider soundscape, making the performance even more lifelike.

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Deep Purple & The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra – Concerto For Group And Orchestra (1969/2002) [2.0 & 5.1] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Deep Purple & The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra – Concerto For Group And Orchestra (1969) [Reissue 2002]
PS3 Rip | 2x SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 112:49 minutes | Scans included | 8,19 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 2,16 GB

Back in 1970, it seemed as though any British group that could was starting to utilize classical elements in their work — for some, like ELP, that meant quoting from the classics as often and loudly as possible, while for others, like Yes, it meant incorporating classical structures into their albums and songs. Deep Purple, at the behest of keyboardman Jon Lord, fell briefly into the camp of this offshoot of early progressive rock with the Concerto for Group and Orchestra. For most fans, the album represented the nadir of the classic (i.e., post-Rod Evans) group: minutes of orchestral meandering lead into some perfectly good hard rock jamming by the band, but the trip is almost not worth the effort. Ritchie Blackmore sounds great and plays his heart out, and you can tell this band is going to go somewhere, just by virtue of the energy that they put into these extended pieces. The classical influences mostly seem drawn from movie music composers Dimitri Tiomkin and Franz Waxman (and Elmer Bernstein), with some nods to Rachmaninoff, Sibelius, and Mahler, and they rather just lay there. Buried in the middle of the second movement is a perfectly good song, but you’ve got to get to it through eight minutes of orchestral noodling on either side. The third movement is almost bracing enough to make up for the flaws of the other two, though by itself, it wouldn’t make the album worthwhile — Pink Floyd proved far more adept at mixing group and orchestra, and making long, slow, lugubrious pieces interesting. As a bonus, however, the producers have added a pair of hard rock numbers by the group alone, “Wring That Neck” and “Child in Time,” that were played at the same concert. They and the third movement of the established piece make this worth a listen.

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