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Tag: Carlos Santana

Santana – Blessings and Miracles (2021) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Santana – Blessings and Miracles (2021)
FLAC (tracks) 24bit/96kHz | Time – 00:56:45 minutes | 1,23 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download | Front Cover | © BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

Santana have announced a new album, Blessings and Miracles, which will arrive on Oct. 15. The LP will feature appearances by several guest musicians and collaborators, including Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, Steve Winwood, Chris Stapleton, Rick Rubin and Corey Glover of Living Colour.

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Carlos Santana – Havana Moon (1983/1988/2018) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Carlos Santana – Havana Moon (1983/1988/2018)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz  | Time – 46:15 minutes | 1,34 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Booklet, Front Cover | © Columbia

The third Carlos Santana solo album marks a surprising turn toward 1950s rock & roll and Tex-Mex, with covers such as Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love” and Chuck Berry’s title song. Produced by veteran R&B producers Jerry Wexler and Barry Beckett, the album features an eclectic mix of sidemen, including Booker T. Jones of Booker T & the MG’s, Willie Nelson, and the Fabulous Thunderbirds. Havana Moon is a light effort, but it’s one of Santana’s most enjoyable albums, which may explain why it was also the best-selling Santana album outside the group releases in ten years.

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Alice Coltrane and Carlos Santana – Illuminations (1974) [Reissue 2017] {2.0 & 5.1} PS3 ISO + FLAC

Turiya Alice Coltrane & Devadip Carlos Santana (1974) [Reissue 2017]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 35:47 minutes | Scans included | 1,58 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans incl. | 720 MB
Features Stereo and Quadrophonic Surround Sound | Label: Vocalion # CDSML 8530

Illuminations is a 1974 collaboration between Alice Coltrane and Carlos Santana. For his third duet album, Carlos Santana performed the works of John Coltrane, paired with Coltrane’s widow, harpist/keyboardist Alice Coltrane, on this instrumental album. Side One includes several contemplative, string-filled numbers, while Side Two presents Santana’s re-creation of John Coltrane’s late free jazz style in “Angel of Sunlight.” Columbia Records could not have been pleased at Santana’s determined drift into esoteric jazz: Illuminations was the first of the nine Santana-related albums so far released in the U.S. not to go gold.

Jazz musicians Jules Broussard, Jack DeJohnette and Dave Holland also contributed to the record, on saxophone, flute, drums and bass. Alice Coltrane delivers some harp glissando, while the string orchestra adds a serene mood to the music. Carlos Santana (whose Indian name “Devadip” appears on the sleeve) plays electric guitar in his own fashion, utilizing feedback, long notes and simple melodies, letting much space to the other instruments. The album is conceived as an instrumental jazz album, with lengthy solos on guitar, saxophone and keyboards. The introduction to “Angel of Air”, with its violins, has been sampled by the Cinematic Orchestra. It is his first of three solo albums (the others being Oneness and The Swing of Delight) to be released under his temporary Sanskrit name Devadip Carlos Santana, given to him by Sri Chinmoy.

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Carlos Santana & John McLaughlin – Live At Montreux 2011 (2013) [Hi-Res FLAC from Blu-Ray] {24bit/96kHz}

Santana and McLaughlin – Live At Montreux 2011 (2013)
FLAC(Tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 134:46 minutes | 2,99 MB
Source: Blu-Ray (Eagle Rock Entertainment > LPCM 24/96 track)
Cover sleeve & Digital booklet

On July 1st, 2011, Montreux hosted the reunion of two master guitarists, Carlos Santana and John McLaughlin, with their Invitation To Illumination concert. Both musicians have been regulars at Montreux across the years but this was the first time they headlined their own concert together. The show features most of the tracks from their classic 1973 album Love Devotion Surrender mixed in with a wealth of other material. The evening was a showcase of supreme musical virtuosity and spirituality and typified the approach of these two great artists. It is certainly a performance not to be missed.

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Carlos Santana and John McLaughlin – Love Devotion Surrender (1973) [MFSL SACD 2011] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Carlos Santana and John McLaughlin – Love Devotion Surrender (1973) [MFSL SACD 2011]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 38:54 minutes | Scans included | 1,7 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 905 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # UDSACD 2080

A hopelessly misunderstood record in its time by Santana fans — they were still reeling from the radical direction shift toward jazz on Caravanserai and praying it was an aberration — it was greeted by Santana devotees with hostility, contrasted with kindness from major-league critics like Robert Palmer. To hear this recording in the context of not only Carlos Santana’s development as a guitarist, but as the logical extension of the music of John Coltrane and Miles Davis influencing rock musicians — McLaughlin, of course, was a former Davis sideman — this extension makes perfect sense in the post-Sonic Youth, post-rock era. With the exception of Coltrane’s “Naima” and McLaughlin’s “Meditation,” this album consists of merely three extended guitar jams played on the spiritual ecstasy tip — both men were devotees of guru Shri Chinmoy at the time. The assembled band included members of Santana’s band and the Mahavishnu Orchestra in Michael Shrieve, Billy Cobham, Doug Rauch, Armando Peraza, Jan Hammer (playing drums!), and Don Alias. But it is the presence of the revolutionary jazz organist Larry Young — a colleague of McLaughlin’s in Tony Williams’ Lifetime band — that makes the entire project gel. He stands as the great communicator harmonically between the two very different guitarists whose ideas contrasted enough to complement one another in the context of Young’s aggressive approach to keep the entire proceeding in the air. In the acknowledgement section of Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme,” which opens the album, Young creates a channel between Santana’s riotous, transcendent, melodic runs and McLaughlin’s rapid-fire machine-gun riffing. Young’ double-handed striated chord voicings offered enough for both men to chew on, leaving free-ranging territory for percussive effects to drive the tracks from underneath. Check “Let Us Go Into the House of the Lord,” which was musically inspired by Bobby Womack’s “Breezing” and dynamically foreshadowed by Pharoah Sanders’ read of it, or the insanely knotty yet intervallically transcendent “The Life Divine,” for the manner in which Young’s organ actually speaks both languages simultaneously. Young is the person who makes the room for the deep spirituality inherent in these sessions to be grasped for what it is: the interplay of two men who were not merely paying tribute to Coltrane, but trying to take his ideas about going beyond the realm of Western music to communicate with the language of the heart as it united with the cosmos. After three decades, Love Devotion Surrender still sounds completely radical and stunningly, movingly beautiful.

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