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Tim Buckley – Blue Afternoon (1969) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)


Tim Buckley – Blue Afternoon (1969) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Artwork | 822mb
Folk, Rock, Jazz | 1969 US LP | Straight STS 1060

Blue Afternoon was Tim Buckley’s first self-produced record and his debut for Herb Cohen and Frank Zappa’s Straight label. Buckley’s first two albums were very much of their time and place, with their psychedelically tinged folk-rock compositions; naïve, romantic lyrical content; and moments of earnest protest. The introduction of acoustic bass and vibes into the arrangements on Happy Sad signalled a change in direction, however, and Blue Afternoon displayed similar jazz tendencies, using the same group of musicians plus drummer Jimmy Madison. Several tracks on Blue Afternoon are songs Buckley had intended to record on earlier albums but had not completed. The brooding “Chase the Blues Away” and the lighter, more upbeat “Happy Time,” for instance, are numbers he had worked on in the summer of 1968 for possible inclusion on Happy Sad. (Demos can be heard on Rhino’s Works in Progress album.) Here, as he did on Happy Sad, Buckley takes the folk song as his starting point and expands it, drawing on jazz influences to create new dynamics and to emphasize atmosphere and mood. This approach can be best appreciated on the mournful “The River,” as simple acoustic guitar, cymbals, and vibes build a fluid, ebbing, and flowing arrangement around Buckley’s beautiful, melancholy vocals. The period between 1968 and 1970 was an intensely creative one for Tim Buckley. Remarkably, during the same four weeks in which he recorded Blue Afternoon, he also recorded its follow-up, Lorca, and material for Starsailor. It’s not surprising, then, that Blue Afternoon hints at Buckley’s subsequent musical direction. While not in the experimental, avant-garde vein of the more challenging material on those next two albums, “The Train” foregrounds Lee Underwood’s quietly intense, jazzy guitar and Buckley’s vocal prowess, prefiguring the feeling of tracks like Lorca’s “Nobody Walkin’” and Starsailor’s “Monterey.” Wilson Neate, Allmusic.

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Tyrannosaurus Rex – Prophets, Seers & Sages / My People Were Fair (1968) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)



Tyrannosaurus Rex – Prophets, Seers & Sages / My People Were Fair (1968) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Artwork | 1404mb
Psychedelia, Acid Folk | 1972 UK double LP reissue | Fly TOOFA 3/4

My People Were Fair approaches the listener from a totally unique angle. The Bolan voice, hardened from the slight warble which carried through his early solo material (still noticeable on the backups he performed for John’s Children), remains uncompromising, but it blends so perfectly with the bizarre, almost Eastern-sounding instrumentation that the most lasting impression is of a medieval caravansary whose demented Bedouin cast has suddenly been let loose in a recording studio. It is an irresistible affair, if absolutely a child of its psychedelically-inclined time.
The most underrated of Tyrannosaurus Rex’s four albums, Prophets, Seers & Sages was recorded just six months after their debut and adds little to the landscapes which that set mapped out. There is the same reliance on the jarring juxtaposition of rock rhythms in a folky discipline; the same abundance of obscure, private mythologies; the same skewed look at the latest studio dynamics, fed through the convoluted wringer of the duo’s imagination — the already classic pop of the opening “Deboraarobed” is further dignified by its segue into the same performance played backwards, a fairly groundbreaking move at a time when even the Beatles were still burying such experiments deep in the mix. But if the album itself found the duo rooted to the musical spot, still it delivered some of Marc Bolan’s most resonant songs. Dave Thompson Allmusic.

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Van Der Graaf Generator – H to He, Who am the Only One (1970) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)


Van Der Graaf Generator – H to He, Who am the Only One (1970) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Artwork | 1007mb
Progressive Rock | 1972 UK repress | Charisma CAS 1027

The foreboding crawl of the Hammond organ is what made Van Der Graaf Generator one of the darkest and most engrossing of all the early progressive bands. On H to He Who Am the Only One, the brooding tones of synthesizer and oscillator along with Peter Hammil’s distinct and overly ominous voice make it one of this British band’s best efforts. Kicking off with the prog classic “Killer,” an eight minute synthesized feast of menacing tones and threatening lyrics, the album slowly becomes shadowed with Van Der Graaf’s sinister instrumental moodiness. With superb percussion work via Guy Evans, who utilizes the tympani drum to its full extent, tracks like “The Emperor in His War-Room” and “Lost” are embraced with a blackened texture that never fades. The effective use of saxophone (both alto and tenor) and baritone from David Jackson gives the somberness some life without taking away any of the instrumental petulance. H to He is carpeted with a science fiction theme, bolstered by the bleak but extremely compelling use of heavy tones and the absence of rhythms and flighty pulsations. This album, which represents Van Der Graaf in their most illustrious stage, is a pristine example of how dark progressive rock should sound. Mike DeGagne, Allmusic.

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Nektar – Recycled (1975) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)


Nektar – Recycled (1975) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Artwork | 849mb
Progressive Rock | 1977 UK LP | Decca SKL-R 5250

This is one of those rare magical albums which feels like its own planet out in space somewhere, inhabited by little sounds and creatures that you become familiar with over time and pay repeated visits to. Great keyboards, great vocals (even a choir, masterfully done), and one of the most grand and epic atmospheres it is possible to experience on record. I think Larry Fast’s synth contributions make for a large part of this, which is why, for me, this is the Nektar album that stands apart from the rest and breaks through into the realm of classics. Flowing concept-style albums don’t get much better than this.Corbet, Prog Archives.

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National Lampoon’s Vacation – Soundtrack (1983) (US Pressing) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

National Lampoon’s Vacation – Soundtrack (1983) (US Pressing) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

vinyl rip in 24/96 & 16/44.1 | 635 MB & 172 MB | FLAC | no cue or log (vinyl)
DR Analysis | Full LP Artwork | US Pressing
Genre: Soundtrack | Warner Bros. Records ~ 1-23909

National Lampoon’s Vacation, is a 1983 comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and starring Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo, Randy Quaid, Dana Barron and Anthony Michael Hall. The film features numerous others, such as comedians John Candy and Imogene Coca, model Christie Brinkley, and Jane Krakowski, in smaller roles. The screenplay was written by John Hughes, based on his short story in National Lampoon Magazine, Vacation ’58 (the screenplay changes the year to 1983). The original story is a (reportedly) fictionalized account of his own family’s ill-fated trip to Disneyland (changed to Walley World for the film) when Hughes was a boy. The success of the film helped advance his screenwriting career.

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Pat Metheny Group – The Falcon And The Snowman (1985) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Pat Metheny Group – The Falcon And The Snowman (1985) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl Rip in 24 Bit-96 kHz | Redbook 16 Bit-44 kHz | FLAC | Cue | No Log | Scans | 794 MB + 216 MB
1985 / Genre: Jazz Fusion – Soundtrack / EMI Records – NL

The Falcon and the Snowman is an album of original music for the soundtrack of the Orion Pictures film of the same title, composed by Pat Metheny and Lyle Mays.
The music is performed by the Pat Metheny Group with occasional orchestrations for strings. The exceptions are a male chorus featuring a young alto which bookends the album and “This Is Not America,” a collaboration with David Bowie, credited as producer and co-composer, who performs lyrics for an arrangement of the theme heard in the track “Chris.”
This beautiful soundtrack album is a great example of their musical creativity. Mastered by Bob Ludwig (great sound!). Enjoy this vinyl version!

Note > No silence was deleted; please burn this album gapless..

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Patrick O’Hearn – Rivers Gonna Rise (1988) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Patrick O’Hearn – Rivers Gonna Rise (1988) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl Rip in 24 bit-96Khz | Redbook 16 bit-44kHz | FLAC | Cue | No Log | Covers | 876 MB + 241 MB
1988 / Genre: Jazz-New Age-Electronic – Private Music – USA

Remarkable atmosferic and melodious music with Jazz and New Age influences..

“Rivers Gonna Rise” is a very nice album; the music is very accessable and energetic. The soundquality of this album is outstanding. It has an open, wide and deep soundstage (deeeeep…Bass) such as you do not hear often. Listen for yourself…

Note > No silence was deleted; please burn this album gapless..

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Kate & Anna McGarrigle – Kate & Anna McGarrigle (1975) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Kate & Anna McGarrigle – Kate & Anna McGarrigle (1975) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl Rip in 24 Bit-96 kHz | Redbook 16 Bit-44 kHz | FLAC | Cue | No Log | Scans | 697 MB + 188 MB
1975 / Genre: Folk – Contemporary Folk – Warner Bros – NL

Kate (February 6, 1946 – January 18, 2010) and Anna (1944) McGarrigle were a pair of Canadian singer-songwriters from Quebec, who performed as a duo until Kate McGarrigle’s death on January 18, 2010.
Kate and Anna McGarrigle is the self-titled 1975 debut album by Kate and Anna McGarrigle. A gem of an album where the two sisters give away unique and beautiful vocal harmonies; this is a varied album, with entertaining folk songs and touching ballads. I was very happy to find a few weeks ago a n.m. copy of Kate & Anna McGarrigle’s debut album which replaces my very old copy.. Kate died January 18, 2010 at the age of 63 year. She has left behind beautiful memories… Enjoy this impressive album and great recording!

Note > No silence was deleted; please burn this album gapless..

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Galliard – New Dawn (1970) (2012 EU Reissue) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)


Galliard – New Dawn (1970) (2012 EU Reissue) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Rock, Jazz, Folk, Psychedelia | 2012 EU reissue | Sweet Dandelion SWDDL 726

Galliard were in on the ground floor of the British progressive rock movement, releasing their debut album, Strange Pleasure, in 1969 and mixing jazz, rock, folk, and psychedelic influences. The following year, New Dawn pretty much picked up where its predecessor left off, with one key exception. The band had initially featured two wind players, Dave Caswell and John Smith; though Smith was absent from New Dawn, a whole brace of additional horn players had been brought in to augment the sound. This was during the period when the likes of Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears (and their British equivalents) were starting out, and brass-rock was all the rage. That’s not to suggest that Galliard were trying to ride the brass-rock gravy train — their work is too skilled and varied for that — but simply that they were right in time for the Zeitgeist. Some cuts, like “New Dawn Breaking” and “Open Up Your Mind,” make full use of the horn section, coming off like a cross between early Chicago and jazzy U.K. prog rockers Colosseum, but that’s far from the dominant sound on this eclectic outing. Lead guitarist Richard Pannell’s sitar work on “Ask for Nothing” contributes to a swirling Eastern atmosphere that seems soaked in a kind of psychedelic afterglow from the late ‘60s. “Winter — Spring — Summer” is an ambitious suite full of shifting dynamics and settings, while the gentle, acoustic-based “And Smile Again” echoes Jethro Tull or the more folk-oriented moments of Traffic. “Premonition” is a straight-up jazz-rock instrumental pushed along by Tommy Thomas’ congas, where Pannell and the horns get to stretch out a bit. Closing track “In Your Minds Eye” opens with a couple of minutes of atmospheric, otherworldly tones before bringing things home with a blast of bold-faced, brass-filled prog rock. The striking thing is just how good Galliard were at all of the varied styles they attempt on New Dawn, but sadly, it was to be their last album. James Allen, Allmusic.
This is one of my all-time favourite albums! If you enjoyed “Strange Pleasure” you will probably love this.

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