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Ray Charles – What’D I Say (1959) (Friday Music 180g LP) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Ray Charles – What’D I Say (1959) (Friday Music 180g LP) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Definitve Master vinyl rip (presented in 24/96 & 16/44.1) | FLAC | m3u, cue & Tech Log
Artwork | DR Analysis | 684 / 200 mb incl. recovery | Rhythm & Blues | 1959
Mastered by Kevin Gray @ CoHearent Audio, LA
Friday Music 180g LP / Cat.#: FRM-8029

Here is his most famous Atlantic era recording. Includes the title hit, plus “Rock House (Parts 1 & 2),” “Roll With My Baby,” “Tell Me How Do You Feel.”

What’d I Say is a studio album recorded by Ray Charles in New York City and released in 1959. What’d I Say peaked at #20 on the Billboard “Pop Albums” chart in 1962. The album launched Charles’ first top 10 hit, “What’d I Say”, and became his first gold record.

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Pink Floyd – Works (1983) (Japan LP 1st Pressing) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Pink Floyd – Works (1983) (Japan LP 1st Pressing) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Definitive Master vinyl rip (presented in 24/96 & 16/44.1) | FLAC | m3u, cue & Tech Log
Artwork | DR Analysis | 874 / 241 mb incl. recovery | ProgRock | 1983
Japan LP 1st pressing / Cat.#: EMS-81600

Works is a Pink Floyd compilation album released in 1983 by their former American label, Capitol Records, to compete with their then-current album The Final Cut. The main interest for collectors is the track “Embryo”, an outtake from Ummagumma that later became a concert staple in a greatly elongated form, which originally only appeared in January 1970 on a scarce various artists compilation album promoting Pink Floyd’s UK label Harvest Records entitled Picnic – A Breath of Fresh Air. Also unique to Works, the tracks “Brain Damage” and “Eclipse” are presented as alternate versions, possibly stereo mixes from the master tapes of the quadraphonic edition of The Dark Side of the Moon.
The cover art for the album was inspired by the c. 1948 poster “Nederland industrialiseert” (“Holland industrialises”)[3] designed by Dutch graphic artist Wladimir Flem.

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Nina Hagen Band – Nina Hagen Band (1978) (Music on Vinyl 180g LP) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Nina Hagen Band – Nina Hagen Band (1978) (Music on Vinyl 180g LP) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Definitive Master vinyl rip (presented in 24/96 & 16/44.1) | FLAC | m3u, cue & Tech Log
Artwork | DR Analysis | 957 / 283 mb incl. recovery | Rock | 1978
Music on Vinyl 180g LP (limited to 500 copies coloured vinyl) / Cat.#: MOVLP458
Mastered from the original analog master tapes

One of the most important record in german rock history….

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Mike Oldfield – Ommadawn (1975) (Japan LP 1st Pressing) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Mike Oldfield – Ommadawn (1975) (Japan LP 1st Pressing) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Definitive Master vinyl rip (presented in 24/96 & 16/44.1) | FLAC | m3u, cue & Tech Log
Artwork | DR Analysis | 733 /189 mb incl. recovery | Prog Rock | 1975
Japan LP 1st pressing / Cat.#: YX-7083-VR

Ommadawn still stands as — if not Mike Oldfield’s greatest achievement (can anything displace Tubular Bells?), then at least his most visionary.

– Dave Thompson/AMG (4/5 Stars)

Ommadawn is the third record album by Mike Oldfield, released in 1975 on Virgin Records. The cover photograph was by David Bailey. It peaked at #4 on the UK Albums Chart. The album was reissued in June 2010 with additional content.

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Lightninin’ Hopkins – Lightnin’ (1961) (Analogue Productions 45rpm 2xLP-Set) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Lightninin’ Hopkins – Lightnin’ (1961) (Analogue Productions 45rpm 2xLP-Set) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Definitive Master Vinyl Rip)

Definitive Master vinyl rip (presented in 24/96 & 16/44.1) | FLAC | m3u, cue & Tech Log
Artwork | DR Analysis | 870 / 235 mb incl. recovery | Blues | 1961
Mastered by Steve Hoffman & Kevin Gray @ AcousTech Mastering, Camarillo
Analogue Production 45rpm 180g 2xLP-Set / Cat.#: BVLP 1019

Lightnin’ is among the rewarding acoustic dates Lightnin’ Hopkins delivered in the early ’60s. The session has an informal, relaxed quality, and this approach serves a 48-year-old Hopkins impressively well on both originals like ‘Thinkin’ ‘Bout an Old Friend’ and the familiar ‘Katie Mae’ and enjoyable interpretations of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee’s ‘Back to New Orleans’ and Arthur ‘Big Boy’ Crudup’s ‘Mean Old Frisco.’ Hopkins‘ only accompaniment consists of bassist Leonard Gaskin and drummer Belton Evans, both of whom play in an understated fashion and do their part to make this intimate setting successful. From the remorseful ‘Come Back Baby’ to more lighthearted, fun numbers like ‘You Better Watch Yourself’ and ‘Automobile Blues,’ Lightnin’ is a lot like being in a small club withHopkins as he shares his experiences, insights and humor with you.” – All Music Guide
TAS Recommended! Rated a ‘Best Audiophile Label Recording’ in the November 2009 issue of The Absolute Sound!

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David Sylvian – Gone To Earth (1986) (Double LP) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

David Sylvian – Gone To Earth (1986) (Double LP) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Scans | 1,58 GB | Label: Virgin Schallplatten GmbH
Genre: experimental rock, ambient | RAR 5% | Rec. CAT #302 803-420 | Germany

David Sylvian is a brilliant rock & roll guitarist and vocalist. He is also a great electronic minimalist. Sadly, he tries hard to do both together. Gone to Earth has moments of brilliant instrumental ambience with deep samples and misplaced vocals. The instrumental virtuosity grabs listeners immediately. Sylvian surrounds himself with some of the greats — Bill Nelson, Robert Fripp, and Mel Collins among them. The sound is dynamic and gentle at the same time.

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Barney Kessel – Barney Kessel’s Swingin’ Party at Contemporary (1960) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Barney Kessel – Barney Kessel’s Swingin’ Party at Contemporary (1960) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl Rip | [email protected]/96kHz+CUE+Scans | No LOG | 965 Mb (Incl. 5% Recovery)
Genre ~ Cool, Guitar Jazz | Label ~ Contemporary Records (LAX-3049)

In 1960, a title like Barney Kessel’s Swingin’ Party at Contemporary must have sounded more like popular slang than a style of jazz. And indeed, the double meaning was intentional: this live effort was recorded at a swinging record label party at Contemporary and the music performed by guitarist Barney Kessel is definitely swing. Backed by pianist Marvin Jenkins, bassist Gary Peacock, and drummer Ron Lundberg, Kessel explores a half-dozen classic tunes. The band kicks off with a nine-minute romp called “Bluesology” before dipping into a lovely version of “Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be).” Interestingly, on this latter tune Jenkins plays flute, adding a bit of delicacy to this gentle ballad. There’s a relaxed, eight-minute take on Charlie Parker’s “Now’s the Time,” with Kessel turning in an energetic solo filled with bent strings and blue notes. The band closes with a forceful version of Ahmad Jamal’s “New Rhumba,” with some animated percussion work by Lundberg. With one exception, all of the pieces run over six minutes, leaving plenty of room for the players to stretch their musical legs. Loose, open, and off the cuff, Barney Kessel’s Swingin’ Party at Contemporary finds Kessel and company in great form. For fans and guitar aficionados who missed the party, this swinging set will serve as a fine substitute. ~ AllMusic

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Atlantic Bridge – Atlantic Bridge (1970) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Atlantic Bridge – Atlantic Bridge (1970) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Artwork | 1054mb
Jazz-Rock, Progressive-Rock | 1970 UK LP | Dawn DNLS 3014

An early British fusion band, Atlantic Bridge put out a self-titled instrumental album in 1970. The skills of the players were impressive, and they didn’t compromise their jazz roots, with Jim Philip’s saxes and flute showing a decided John Coltrane influence. Chief arranger Mike McNaught’s electric keyboard provided the most rock-oriented flavour. Daryl Runswick also creates some interesting passages with bowed bass. Covers of “MacArthur Park” and the Beatles’ “Something” and “Dear Prudence” seemed emblematic of a desire to cross over to rock listeners, though it should be noted that it was far less common for a jazz-rock band to interpret such material in 1970 than it would be in the years to come. Richie Unterberger, Allmusic.

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Anthony Phillips – The Geese & The Ghost (1977) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Anthony Phillips – The Geese & The Ghost (1977) (24-Bit/96 Khz + 16-Bit/44.1Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl Rip in 24 Bit-96 kHz | Redbook 16 Bit-44 kHz | FLAC | Cue | No Log | H.Q. Artwork | 941 MB + 240 MB
1977 / Genre: Prog-Rock – Vertigo – U.K.

The Geese and the Ghost is the debut solo album from former Genesis guitarist Anthony Phillips featuring Mike Rutherford and Phil Collins. It was released in 1977 on Passport Records in the US and Hit & Run Music in the UK.
This is a “nearly mint” vinyl copy with H.Q. artwork of Fran Solo (thank you Fran!). Enjoy this masterpiece (+ beautiful recording!) of progressive rock that has to be heard.

Note > No silence was deleted; please burn this album gapless..

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Al Stewart – Zero She Flies (1970) (1974 UK Repress) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Al Stewart – Zero She Flies (1970) (1974 UK Repress) (24-Bit/96 Khz) (Vinyl Rip)

Vinyl rip @ 24/96 | FLAC | Artwork | 807mb | Folk-Rock | 1974 UK repress | CBS 63848

Al Stewart’s third album wasn’t much different from the territory he had claimed, with reasonable success, on his prior effort, Love Chronicles. Narrative tales of romance and experience, sometimes third-person and sometimes autobiographical, set the mood, complemented by mild folk-rock arrangements and Stewart’s warm yet bemused voice. A few placid folk guitar instrumentals break up the involved, lengthy vocal tracks. The best cut is “Electric Los Angeles Sunset,” which puts Stewart’s eye for locale-based storytelling to more forceful use than it had ever been previously heard, detailing the grim side of the city rather than its glamorous one. “Manuscript” was also an important work in its focus upon past history and its effects on various characters, an approach that would within a few years become prevalent in Stewart’s work. Trevor Lucas and Gerry Conway of Fotheringay were among the backup players. Richie Unterberger, Allmusic.

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