Skip to content

HDMusic Posts

Muddy Waters – Folk Singer (1964/2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Muddy Waters – Folk Singer (1964/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 40:34 minutes | 1,82 GB | Genre: Blues
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | Front cover | © Geffen Records

There are a handful of landmark albums in any genre. In the blues, one of them is Muddy Waters’ Folk Singer. Originally released in 1964, Folk Singer was the only acoustic album Waters ever recorded, thus becoming the first and perhaps best blues concept album ever. Now, Folk Singer, which includes fellow blues greats Buddy Guy and Willie Dixon backing up Waters, is being re-released in an expanded version that features two bonus tracks recorded during the two 1964 sessions that followed those for the album – “The Same Thing” and “You Can’t Lose What You Never Had”. Muddy Waters was the king of electric Chicago blues, but on Folk Singer he proved to be, simply, one of the greats of 20th century music.

Comments closed

Claudio Abbado’s Last Concert with the Berliner Philharmoniker (2013) Blu-ray 1080i AVC DTS-HD 5.1

Name: Claudio Abbado’s Last Concert with the Berliner Philharmoniker
Released: 2016
Genre: Classical
Conductor: Claudio Abbado
Сomposer: Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847), Hector Berlioz (1803-1869)
Artist: Deborah York (soprano), Stella Doufexis (mezzo-soprano), Damen des Chors des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Berliner Philharmoniker

Label: © Berlin Phil Media GmbH
Recorded: Philharmonie Berlin 18, 19, 21 May 2013
Quality: Blu-ray Audio/Video
Duration: 01:36:07 +
Video#1: MPEG-4 AVC 950 kbps / 1920*1080i / 29.970 fps / 16:9 / High Profile 4.1
Video#2: MPEG-4 AVC 20999 kbps / 1920*1080i / 29.970 fps / 16:9 / High Profile 4.1
Audio#1: German DTS-HD MA 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3709 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
Audio#2: German LPCM 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2304 kbps / 24-bit
Subtitle: Japanese
Size: 45.46 GB

This marks the second anniversary of Claudio Abbado’s death on 20 January 2014 aged eighty. The set – on CD and Blu-ray (audio and video) – captures Abbado’s final concert with the Berliner Philharmoniker‏ in May 2013. It was the end of a treasured partnership that bore plentiful and remarkable fruit.

Abbado first conducted the Berliner Philharmoniker‏ in 1966, the start of a unique relationship that was to last nearly half a century. Succeeding Herbert von Karajan into the biggest job in the world of classical music Abbado was elected by the members of the orchestra as chief conductor of the Berliner Philharmoniker‏ serving from 1990 to 2002. He became only the fifth chief conductor in the orchestra’s history. Following his resignation from that post Abbado would return to the orchestra as a guest. The relationship between orchestra and Abbado remained cordial and these appearances as guest were clearly events to savour.

In May 2013 there was a series of three concerts at the Philharmonie which turned out to be Abbado’s last with the Berliner Philharmoniker. They were described as a “triumph” by the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Abbado’s programme comprised two key works from composers both close contemporaries: Felix Mendelssohn’s enchanting A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Hector Berlioz’s progressive Symphonie fantastique.

Comments closed

Claudio Abbado, Berliner Philharmoniker – The Last Concert (2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/48kHz]

Claudio Abbado, Berliner Philharmoniker – The Last Concert (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/48 kHz | Time – 01:35:59 minutes | 923 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Source: HDTracks | © Berliner Philharmoniker Recordings
Recorded: Recorded live at the Philharmonie Berlin 18, 19, 21 May 2013

Claudio Abbado (1933–2014) was one of the outstanding personalities in the history of the Berliner Philharmoniker. In May 2013, their unique partnership ended with Abbado’s last concert with the orchestra. The programme included two of the most important works of musical Romanticism: Hector Berlioz’s visionary Symphonie fantastique and Felix Mendelssohn’s magical, shimmering music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream. To mark the second anniversary of Claudio Abbado’s death on 20 January 2016, audio and video recordings of this memorable evening have been released in a hardcover luxury edition. With comprehensive articles, bonus videos and previously unpublished photographs, it documents Abbado’s work with the orchestra whose chief conductor he was from 1990 to 2002.

Comments closed

Sergei Prokofiev: Romeo And Juliet Suites – Andrew Litton, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra (2007) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44.1kHz]

Andrew Litton, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra – Prokofiev: Romeo And Juliet Suites (2007)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/44.1 kHz | Digital Booklet | 607 MB | Genre: Classical
Genre: Classical | Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical | © BIS Records

Combined, Prokofiev’s three suites from Romeo include about half of the score. Still, most conductors who want to give us a full CD (or even a full LP) of Romeo pick their own extracts from the complete ballet instead of stringing together the suites. That’s probably at least partly because they don’t share Prokofiev’s preferences when it comes to favorite moments—but it’s also because, as written, the suites are organized for musical rather than narrative coherence, and thus provide little sense of the play’s dramatic trajectory. One way around the second of these issues, of course, is to reorder the suites: that’s, for instance, what Mitropoulos does with selections from the more popular First and Second. Here Andrew Litton pushes that idea to its limit, giving us all 20 movements of the three suites “in the order the music appears in the ballet score.”

Composer: Sergei Prokofiev
Conductor: Andrew Litton
Orchestra/Ensemble: Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra

Comments closed

Igor Stravinsky – Rite of Spring, Petrushka – Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Andrew Litton (2011) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Igor Stravinsky – Rite of Spring, Petrushka – Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, Andrew Litton (2011)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:09:00 minutes | 571 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download |  Source: eClassical.com | Digital Booklet | © BIS Records
Recorded: August 2008 (Le Sacre du printemps) and June 2009 (Pétrouchka) at the Grieghallen, Bergen, Norway

International Record Review: Oustanding May 2011; Classics Today 10/10; Music Web International Recording of the Month May 2011: “If you want one old cynic’s honest opinion, I think it’s as damn near definitive as I’m ever likely to hear”.

Comments closed

Kazumi Watanabe, Mike Mainieri, Warren Bernhardt – Lotus Night (2011/2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Kazumi Watanabe, Mike Mainieri, Warren Bernhardt – Lotus Night (2011/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 59:12 minutes | 0,99 GB | Genre: Jazz
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover | © WM Japan

Kazumi Watanabe is the indisputable #1 guitarist in Japan, voted Best Guiatrist in Swing Journal magazine a mere 31 years in a row! Although jazz is his preferred modus operandi Watanabe has also collaborated with Japanese legends like Ryuichi Sakamoto, Sadao Watanabe and the Yellow Magic Orchestra, bringing huge success at home and international recognition that led to him playing alongside Steps, the Brecker Brothers, Jaco Pastorius and Bill Bruford.

Comments closed

Alison Balsom, Tom Poster – Legende: Works For Trumpet And Piano (2016) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Alison Balsom, Tom Poster – Légende: Works For Trumpet And Piano (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 01:01:12 minutes | 1,01 GB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet | © Warner Classics

The trumpeter Alison Balsom has a rich Warner Classics catalogue, but this is her first CD recital with piano – here played by her long-standing recital partner, Tom Poster.

Comments closed

Jake Bugg – Shangri La (2013) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Jake Bugg – Shangri La (2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 40:04 minutes | 923 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | Front cover | © Island Records

2013 sophomore album from the British singer/songwriter. The album shares its title with the Malibu studio where it was made, once the ’70s haven of Bob Dylan and The Band, now the creative hub of legendary producer Rick Rubin, the recording titan whose jaw dropping c.v. spans from Def Jam and Johnny Cash to Adele and Kanye West. Rubin’s assembled wrecking crew of Shangri La session regulars includes guitarist Matt Sweeney, bassist Jason Lader, and drummers Chad Smith and Pete Thomas. Yet for all its stellar cast and production kudos, the real star of Shangri La is, unquestionably, Bugg himself. Asked to compare Shangri La with its predecessor, Bugg concludes: ‘My first album felt like a list of songs, whereas this one feels like a whole entity with something to say. Or if my first album was the color of grey reality, this one’s the color of the sun’. The color of our planet’s nearest star. Or maybe the sound of a new star intensifying their musical colors.

Comments closed

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphony No.13 ‘Babi Yar’ – Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, Mark Wigglesworth (2006) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphony No.13 ‘Babi Yar’ – Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, Mark Wigglesworth (2006)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:02:22 minutes | 501 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical | Digital Booklet | © BIS Records
Recorded: April 2005 at the Music Centre for Dutch Radio & Television, studio MCO5, Hilversum

‘The majority of my symphonies are tombstones’ – these words by Shostakovich are quoted by conductor Mark Wigglesworth in the liner notes to his fifth disc of Shostakovich’s Symphonies on BIS. Symphony No. 13, subtitled ‘Babi Yar’, is a case in point. Shostakovich explicitly stated that he wanted the Symphony – and in particular it’s first movement – to be a monument over the 100.000 Jews slaughtered at a ravine called Babi Yar outside of Kiev in 1941. Not just a monument, however: the Symphony was also intended as an indictment against the anti-Semitism that had been brought to its height during the Nazi era, but which also flourished in post-war Soviet Union, with the result that Babi Yar and other atrocities were kept secret by the authorities. This silence was deeply upsetting to Shostakovich, and when he read Yevgeny Yevtushenko’s poem Babi Yar, he decided to set it to music. ‘I cannot not write it!’, he said to a friend. Shostakovich had originally only intended to set this one poem by Yevtushenko, but deciding to create a larger-scaled work he chose four more texts for what was to become a symphony in five movements. As Mark Wigglesworth writes, these poems ‘reveal a huge kaleidoscope of Russian events, emotions and ideas.’ In the realization of this kaleidoscope, Wigglesworth has the support of bass soloist Jan-Hendrik Rootering, the men of the Netherlands Radio Choir, and – of course – the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, with which the previous instalment in this series, Symphony No. 8 (BIS-SACD-1483), was recorded, to critical acclaim. The reviewer of BBC Music Magazine put it in the following way: ‘Mark Wigglesworth … stretches the playing of the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic to its very impressive limits and remains the finest Shostakovich interpreter of his generation’, describing the result as ‘a performance which always gives us the full measure of this traumatic masterpiece.’

Comments closed

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphonies Nos.1-3 – Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, Mark Wigglesworth (2012) [Official Digital Download 24bit/44,1kHz]

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphonies Nos.1-3 – Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, Mark Wigglesworth (2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/44,1 kHz | Time – 01:21:13 minutes | 672 MB | Genre: Classical
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: eClassical | Digital Booklet | © BIS Records

This well-filled disc combines the first three symphonies by Dmitri Shostakovich, all written before the composer had reached his twenty-third birthday. The First Symphony was in fact the graduation piece that completed his studies at the Leningrad Conservatory, but to quote Mark Wigglesworth’s own liner notes to this disc, ‘Shostakovich’s trade-mark musical gestures are all immediately obvious. Nervous tension and sarcastic wit, passion and intelligence, contemplation and action, nobility and banality – all expressed with an economy of means that is simultaneously subtle and direct.’ The work was an immediate success, and soon gained worldwide recognition through performances by Walter, Toscanini, and Klemperer. ‘The Soviet Union had discovered its first international star, and the authorities proclaimed him as an exaltation of the new at the expense of the old.’ The two symphonies that followed fared much less well, however, and are still rarely performed in concert. At least nominally, there is a political theme to both works – the Second Symphony was a commission from the State Publishing House to honour the tenth anniversary of the October Revolution, and the Third, with its subtitle ‘The First of May’, was a celebration of the international Worker’s Day. Both works end with choral finales, to texts which proclaim mottos such as ‘Labour, joy and song’ and ‘Revolution, march with a million feet!’, but the scores themselves proved too experimental for the taste of the Soviet authorities, and did little to enhance the standing of their composer. This disc is the penultimate in what ‘could be the most important Shostakovich cycle of recent times’ according to the reviewer on MusicWeb-International. Wigglesworth and his players in the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra have received great acclaim for their performances of the mature symphonies such as the Eighth or Thirteenth, ‘Babi Yar’, and here offer us the beginnings, works which in Mark Wigglesworth’s words ‘encapsulate all the musical ideas that were to remain present throughout the composer’s life.’

Comments closed
%d bloggers like this: