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Category: SACD

Nancy Wilson, Cannonball Adderley (1962/2018) [Official Digital Download DSF DSD128/5.64MHz + FLAC 24bit/96kHz]

Nancy Wilson, Cannonball Adderley (1962/2018)
DSD128 (.dsf) 1 bit/5,6 MHz | Time – 44:25 minutes | 3,5 GB
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time – 44:25 minutes | 987 MB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet | Source: HDTT | Genre: Jazz

Nancy Wilson/Cannonball Adderley is a studio album by Nancy Wilson and Cannonball Adderley originally issued in February 1962 by Capitol Records. The Penguin Guide to Jazz states “The odd session out is the date with Nancy Wilson for Capitol, primarily designed as a showcase for the young singer but with five band-only tracks as well. Wilson had a self-conscious phrasing and melodramatic lighting-up of key lines – but there is a version of “A Sleeping Bee” here which is one of the most charming of all her recordings, and Cannon and the others play personably throughout”. Wilson considered her vocals on the album “as a sort of easy-going third horn”.

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Yes – High Vibration: SACD Box (2013) [Japanese 16 Discs Box Set] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Yes – High Vibration: SACD Box (2013) [Japanese 16 Discs Box Set]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 716:14 mins | Scans included | 29,7 GB
or FLAC 2.0 (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 15,9 GB

High Vibration is a limited edition 16 SACD box set, featuring the 13 albums released by English prog rock supergroup Yes, between 1968 and 1987, including live album “Yessongs”. A unique 12-track bonus SACD features rare selections such “Owner of a Lonely Heart (Move Yourself Mix)” from 1991 and 1972′s “Total Mass Retain (Single version)” is also included. Everything has been newly remastered in Japan by Isao Kikuchi, and comes with a 200-page book (mostly on japanese language). Albums includes: “Yes (1969)”, “Time and a Word (1970)”, “The Yes Album (1971)”, “Fragile (1971)”, “Close to the Edge (1972)”, “Yessongs (1973)”, “Tales from Topographic Oceans (1973)”, “Relayer (1974)”, “Going for the One (1977)”, “Tormato (1978)”, “Drama (1980)”, “90125 (1983)”, and “Big Generator (1987)”.

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Yellowjackets – Time Squared (2003) [2.0 & 5.1] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Yellowjackets – Time Squared (2003) [2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 61:40 minutes | Scans included | 3,75 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,22 GB
Features 2.0 Stereo and 5.1 multichannel surround sound | Label: Heads Up # HUSA 9075

Although sometimes grouped with Spyro Gyra, Yellowjackets are actually one of the most creative regular groups in the “rhythm & jazz” genre. Founded in 1981 as an R&B-oriented band, the long-running crossover jazz outfit that has been a Grammy favorite and a top seller since the 1980s.

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Dead Can Dance – Within The Realm Of A Dying Sun (1987) [MFSL 2008] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Dead Can Dance – Within The Realm Of A Dying Sun (1987) [MFSL 2008]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Scans included | 1,57 GB
SACD-ISO PS3 Rip to FLAC 2.0 | 24 bit / 88,2 kHz | 38:36 min | Scans included | 752 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # SAD 2708 CD

Within the Realm of a Dying Sun is the third studio album by the band Dead Can Dance. It was released on 27 July 1987 by record label 4AD.

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Dead Can Dance – Into The Labyrinth (1993) [MFSL 2008] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Dead Can Dance – Into The Labyrinth (1993) [MFSL 2008]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Scans included | 2,65 GB
SACD-ISO PS3 Rip to FLAC 2.0 | 24 bit / 88,2 kHz | 65:17 min | Scans included | 1,19 GB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # SAD 2711 CD

Into the Labyrinth is the sixth album recorded by the Dead Can Dance duo Lisa Gerrard and Brendan Perry. It marked a strong shift from the previous albums, putting ethnic music influences at the forefront as would be the case in the later albums. It was their first album completed on their own without the aid of guest musicians, and their first album to have a major-label release in the U.S., thanks to a distribution deal that 4AD had with Warner Bros. Records. It featured the single “The Ubiquitous Mr Lovegrove”.

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Dead Can Dance – Spiritchaser (1996) [MFSL 2008] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Dead Can Dance – Spiritchaser (1996) [MFSL 2008]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Scans included | 2,1 GB
SACD-ISO PS3 Rip to FLAC 2.0 | 24 bit / 88,2 kHz | 51:57 min | Scans included | 999 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # SAD 2713 CD

Spiritchaser is the seventh studio album by Dead Can Dance, and the last before Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard went their separate ways. It expands on its exploration of world music, and like Into the Labyrinth, was recorded at Quivvy Church, Perry’s personal studio in Ireland.

The album was dedicated to Lisa Gerrard’s deceased brother, Mark Gerrard.

The track “Indus” contains a melody that is very similar to that of “Within You Without You”, a Beatles song that George Harrison wrote and recorded with Indian musicians in 1967. Although not deliberate, Perry and Gerrard were asked to contact Harrison for his permission to use it; he granted it, but the record company insisted that they give him partial songwriting credit on “Indus”.

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Quincy Jones – Ultimate Collection (2002) {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Quincy Jones – Ultimate Collection (2002)
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 75:34 minutes | Scans included | 3,04 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,36 GB

In 1974, Quincy Jones, who already had a wide range of musical credits behind him, opted to enter the R&B mainstream by hiring vocalists and overseeing recordings in a commercial vein released under his name. The first of them was Body Heat, which went gold, and Jones followed with a series of records including 1981’s million-selling The Dude and the 1990 Album of the Year Grammy-winner Back on the Block. Meanwhile, he switched record labels, leaving A&M for his own Warner-distributed Qwest in the early ’80s. That has tended to make the assembly of a comprehensive best-of difficult, but Universal’s Hip-O reissue division specializes in licensing material from other labels to construct its Ultimate Collection releases, and this one borrows seven out of 18 tracks from Qwest to add to Jones’ A&M hits, making it the definitive one-disc compilation of Jones’ pop/R&B recordings of 1974-1999. Jones himself participated in the selection, which does not strictly follow chart rankings, since a couple of R&B Top 20 hits (“I Don’t Go for That” and “Slow Jams”) are missing, while a few non-chart items are included. To get more songs in, the singles edits have been used in many cases. But all the major hits are here. The chronological sequencing allows an appreciation of how Jones’ approach changed over the years. The ’70s stuff, which holds up surprisingly well, is tasty R&B, much of it groove-oriented, up-tempo music. By the late ’80s, however, there are a lot of big, bland ballads that showcase superstar vocalists (Ray Charles, Barry White, etc.) and sound self-important. Like his protégé, Michael Jackson, who went from the rocking “Billie Jean” to the messianic “Man in the Mirror” in the same period, Jones seems to have begun believing his press clippings, and his work suffered accordingly.

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New York Trio – Always (2008) [Japan 2016] {SACD ISO + FLAC}

New York Trio – Always (2008) [Japan 2016]
SACD Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 48:59 minutes | Front/Rear Covers | 2,0 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Front/Rear Covers | 1,01 GB
Genre: Jazz

The New York Trio, consisting of pianist Bill Charlap, bassist Jay Leonhart, and drummer Bill Stewart, have put together a spectacular jazz lineup for this audiophile SACD. Also known as the New York Jazz Trio, the group is known for recording classic standards in a straightforward, post-bop style. Together, they are a successful force, having marked their spot in East Coast jazz scene. But separately, they have also each reached their individual levels of success. In his career, pianist Bill Charlap has played alongside jazz icons Tony Bennett, Benny Carter, and Gerry Mulligan, and has recorded a handful of well-received albums as a bandleader. Jay Leonhart, a bassist for the Trio, has also dabbled in vocals and songwriting and has performed with Marian McPartland, Louie Bellson, Lee Konitz, and many others. And drummer Bill Stewart has rubbed musical elbows on stage with jazz guitarist John Scofield, sax player Maceo Parker and R&B legend James Brown.

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Oscar Peterson, Ray Brown, Milt Jackson – The Very Tall Band: Live at the Blue Note (1999) [Telarc] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Oscar Peterson, Ray Brown, Milt Jackson – The Very Tall Band (1999) [Telarc]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 70:23 minutes | Scans included | 2,86 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,29 GB

Oscar Peterson’s landmark meeting with Milt Jackson in the mid-’60s produced the very successful studio date Very Tall. They’ve played and recorded together on a number of occasions since then, joined by Ray Brown more often than not, but these live tracks recorded at the Blue Note are among their most satisfying sessions. Peterson continues his strong comeback from the serious stroke that he suffered in 1993, replacing his once ferocious tempos with an uncanny lyricism. Brown’s introduction to “Blues for JR” and his bass solo medley are superb, while Jackson remains a master of the blues. The finale of “Caravan” features drummer Karriem Riggins and brings the session to a thunderous climax. Highly recommended.

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Weezer – Weezer (1994) {Blue Album} [MFSL ‘2014] {PS3 ISO + FLAC}

Weezer – Weezer (1994) {Blue Album} [MFSL ‘2014]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 41:20 minutes | Scans included | 1,68 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included | 828 MB
Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab # 2160

Even if you lived through it, it’s hard to fathom exactly why Weezer were disliked, even loathed, when they released their debut album in the spring of 1994. If you grew up in the years after the heyday of grunge, it may even seem absurd that the band were considered poseurs, hair metal refugees passing themselves off as alt-rock by adapting a few tricks from the Pixies and Nirvana songbooks and sold to MTV with stylish videos. Nevertheless, during alt-rock’s heyday of 1994, Weezer was second only to Stone Temple Pilots as an object of scorn, bashed by the rock critics and hipsters alike. Time has a way of healing, even erasing, all wounds, and time has been nothing but kind to Weezer’s eponymous debut album (which would later be dubbed The Blue Album, due to the blue background of the cover art). At the time of its release, the group’s influences were discussed endlessly — the dynamics of the Pixies, the polished production reminiscent of Nevermind, the willful outsider vibe borrowed from indie rock — but few noted how the group, under the direction of singer/songwriter Rivers Cuomo, synthesized alt-rock with a strong ’70s trash-rock predilection and an unwitting gift for power pop, resulting in something quite distinctive. Although the group wears its influences on its sleeve, Weezer pulls it together in a strikingly original fashion, thanks to Cuomo’s urgent melodicism, a fondness for heavy, heavy guitars, a sly sense of humor, and damaged vulnerability, all driven home at a maximum volume. While contemporaries like Pavement were willfully, even gleefully obscure, and skewed toward a more selective audience, Weezer’s insecurities were laid bare, and the band’s pop culture obsessions tended to be universal, not exclusive. Plus, Cuomo wrote killer hooks and had a band that rocked hard — albeit in an uptight, nerdy fashion — winding up with direct, immediate music that connects on more than one level. It’s both clever and vulnerable, but those sensibilities are hidden beneath the loud guitars and catchy hooks. That’s why the band had hits with this album — and not just hits, but era-defining singles like the deliberate dissonant crawl of “Undone – The Sweater Song,” the postironic love song of “Buddy Holly,” the surging “Say It Ain’t So” — but could still seem like a cult band to the dedicated fans; it sounded like the group was speaking to an in-crowd, not the mass audience it wound up with. If, as Howard Hawks said, a good movie consists of three great scenes and no bad ones, it could be extrapolated that a good record contains three great songs and no bad ones — in that case, Weezer is a record with at least six or seven great songs and no bad ones. That makes for a great record, but more than that, it’s a great record emblematic of its time, standing as one of the defining albums of the ’90s.

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