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Category: DVD-A

VA – Inside The Music – Classic Country (2001) [DVD-Audio ISO]

VA – Inside The Music – Classic Country
Artist: Various Artists | Album: Inside The Music – Classic Country | Style: Country | Year: 2001 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1, DTS 5.1) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 11 | Size: ~2.6 Gb | Recovery: 5% | Release: DVD International | Silverline (B000059LH0), 2001 | Note: Not Watermarked

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VA – SACD-LAB Demo Disc 1-3 (2008) [DVD-Audio ISO]

VA – SACD-LAB Demo Disc 1-3
Artist: Various artists | Album: SACD-LAB Demo Disc 1 | Style: Electronic, Rock, Classic | Year: 2008 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 3+3+6 | Size: 914+903+ 1630 Mb | Recovery: 5% | Release: © SACD-LAB, 2008 | Note: Not Watermarked

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VA – DVD-Audio Music Sampler Vol.2 (2003) [DVD-Audio ISO]

VA – DVD-Audio Music Sampler Vol.2
Artist: Various Artists | Album: DVD-Audio Music Sampler Vol.2 | Style: Rock, Blues, Hip-Hop | Year: 2003 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 48kHz/24Bit, DTS 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, DTS 5.1 48kHz/24Bit, DTS ES 6.1 48kHz/24Bit, LPCM 2.0 48kHz/24Bit) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 9 | Size: 3.49 Gb | Recovery: 3% | Covers: in archive | Release: DTS Entertainment (DTS DVA 6516024600), 2003 | Note: Not Watermarked

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VA – Acura RDX Demonstration Disc (2006) [DVD-Audio ISO]

VA – Acura RDX Demonstration Disc
Artist: Various Artists | Album: Acura RDX Demonstration Disc | Style: Electronic, Funk, Soul, Hip-Hop, Jazz, Rock | Year: 2006 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 48kHz/24Bit, MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 25 | Size: ~3.93 Gb | Recovery: 5% | Covers: in archive | Release: © Rhino Special Products, 2006 | Panasonic (OPDA-7826), 2006 | Note: Not Watermarked

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Van Zant – Brother To Brother (2003) [DVD-AUDIO ISO]

Van Zant – Brother To Brother
Artist: Van Zant | Album: Brother To Brother | Style: Country, Southern Rock | Year: 2003 [1998 original] | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 11 | Size: 3.4 Gb | Recovery: 5% | Covers: in archive | Release: Sanctuary | Silverline Records (288186-9), 2003 | Note: Not Watermarked

Brother to Brother marks the first time Johnny and Donnie Van Zant have ever collaborated together, and the results are exactly what fans of either Lynyrd Skynyrd or .38 Special would expect — a set of tough, bluesy Southern rock. Instrumentally, it nearly achieves its full potential, capturing both of the guitarists in fine form. However, the material is a bit inconsistent, with several songs lacking memorable hooks or melodies. Still, the songs that do work are dynamite, and even the weaker tracks have their moments. And that means Brother to Brother is a worth a listen by any serious Skynyrd, Special or VanZant fan.

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Andrea Bocelli, Renee Fleming, Valery Gergiev – Verdi: Requiem (2003) [DVD-Audio ISO]

Andrea Bocelli, Renee Fleming, Valery Gergiev – Verdi: Requiem (2003)
Conductor: Valery Gergiev | Composer: Giuseppe Verdi | Orchestra: Kirov Orchestra and Chorus | Album: Verdi – Requiem | Style: Classical | Year: 2003 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 48kHz/24Bit, MLP 2.0 48kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 15 | Size: ~6.46 Gb | Covers: in archive | Release: Philips | Decca (B0001571-19 PDA), 2003 | Note: Not Watermarked

Giuseppe Verdi is one of the most tuneful, beloved composers of vocal music Italy has produced. Verdi wrote REQUIEM in honor of Alessandro Manzoni, an Italian poet and novelist he greatly admired. Acclaimed tenor Andrea Bocelli and soprano Renee Fleming, along with conductor Valery Gergiev and the Kirov Orchestra, perform a moving rendition of this heartfelt work, perfectly capturing the depth of emotion and challenging musical requirements of this work. Any classical-music lover will appreciate this performance.

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The Mavericks – The Mavericks (2003) [DVD-AUDIO ISO]

The Mavericks – The Mavericks
Artist: The Mavericks | Album: The Mavericks | Style: Rock, Country | Year: 2003 [1998 original] | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1 48kHz/24Bit) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 11 | Size: 3.22 Gb | Recovery: 3% | Covers: in archive | Release: Sanctuary Records/ 5.1 Label Group / Silverline Records (288213-9), 2003 | Note: Not Watermarked

On their first studio album since leaving MCA in 1999, the Mavericks find themselves at a creative crossroads. While vocalist and songwriter Raul Malo is able to freely indulge his muse on any number of projects, the band as whole has been making numerous musical decisions. The results are not always positive. First, the good news: when at their best, as they are for a good part of this recording, the Mavericks are simply the best there is. On tracks such as “In My Dreams,” informed as it is by Roy Orbison’s ghost and Malo’s deeply expressive singing, the band becomes larger than life. Singing a midtempo ballad, the band gathers around him and allows him to walk out on the emotional edge of his vocal and dig a lot deeper than the arrangement would normally suggest. Likewise, on the son-infused “Shine a Light” sheeny Cuban soul acts as the fiber the tune builds upon. A well-placed horn section and numerous strains of polyrhythmic drive make this the party tune everybody’s been waiting to hear from them. Likewise, the slow rumba feel of “Wondering” with Malo’s ’50s-influenced singing makes this the greatest song k.d. lang never recorded. “By the Time” showcases the band’s still deep country waltz roots, and the B-3 touch that hovers in the background is positively haunting. The slightly funky country AOR root of “Time Goes By” is one of the dirtiest and most emotional tunes the group has ever recorded. The Latin lounge of “San Jose” — not the Bacharach tune — would be the best thing on the album if it weren’t for the badly intoned synthed-out strings. Likewise, “Would You Believe” and “Because of You” with their thickly textured busy-ness draw away from the emotion inherent in them, and they are swallowed by arrangements. The performance of “Air That I Breathe,” while valiant and seemingly heartfelt, cannot redeem this song from the shmaltz pile. The Mavericks are still more than capable of coming up with the goods when it comes to fine songwriting and performances, but next time they should hire a producer to rough up their overly rounded surfaces. Malo may indeed be the problem, trying to maneuver his band into playing for his solo moods, but with a unit this fine, he should be writing for them.

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The Moody Blues – Days of Future Passed (2006) [DVD-AUDIO ISO]

The Moody Blues – Days of Future Passed
Artist: The Moody Blues | Album: Days of Future Passed | Style: Progressive rock | Year: 2006 [1967 original] | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 7 | Size: 2.84 Gb | Recovery: 3% | Covers: in archive | Release: rip of SACD by © Decca | Deram (983 215-0), 2006 | Note: Not Watermarked

This album marked the formal debut of the psychedelic-era Moody Blues; though they’d made a pair of singles featuring new (as of 1966) members Justin Hayward and John Lodge, Days of Future Passed was a lot bolder and more ambitious. What surprises first-time listeners — and delighted them at the time — is the degree to which the group shares the spotlight with the London Festival Orchestra without compromising their sound or getting lost in the lush mix of sounds. That’s mostly because they came to this album with the strongest, most cohesive body of songs in their history, having spent the previous year working up a new stage act and a new body of material (and working the bugs out of it on-stage), the best of which ended up here. Decca Records had wanted a rock version of Dvorak’s “New World Symphony” to showcase its enhanced stereo-sound technology, but at the behest of the band, producer Tony Clarke (with engineer Derek Varnals aiding and abetting) hijacked the project and instead cut the group’s new repertory, with conductor/arranger Peter Knight adding the orchestral accompaniment and devising the bridge sections between the songs’ and the album’s grandiose opening and closing sections. The record company didn’t know what to do with the resulting album, which was neither classical nor pop, but following its release in December of 1967, audiences found their way to it as one of the first pieces of heavily orchestrated, album-length psychedelic rock to come out of England in the wake of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s and Magical Mystery Tour albums. What’s more, it was refreshingly original, rather than an attempt to mimic the Beatles; sandwiched among the playful lyricism of “Another Morning” and the mysticism of “The Sunset,” songs like “Tuesday Afternoon” and “Twilight Time” (which remained in their concert repertory for three years) were pounding rockers within the British psychedelic milieu, and the harmony singing (another new attribute for the group) made the band’s sound unique. With “Tuesday Afternoon” and “Nights in White Satin” to drive sales, Days of Future Passed became one of the defining documents of the blossoming psychedelic era, and one of the most enduringly popular albums of its era.

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The Foundations – The Very Best of the Foundations (2002) [DVD-Audio ISO]

The Foundations – The Very Best of the Foundations
Artist: The Foundations | Album: The Very Best of the Foundations | Style: R&B, Soul, Pop | Year: 2002 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 96kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 14 | Size: ~2.37 Gb | Recovery: 5% | Covers: in archive | Release: Silverline Records (288092-9), 2002 | Note: Not Watermarked

This budget compilation contains some of the best-known work from this English soul group. Put together in DVD audio, it’s a nice treat for longtime fans of the band. Those new to the Foundations or just looking for a particular song might be better off with a standard compilation.

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The Flaming Lips – The Soft Bulletin (2005) [DVD-Audio ISO]

The Flaming Lips – The Soft Bulletin
Artist: The Flaming Lips | Album: The Soft Bulletin | Style: Rock, Experimental, Psychedelic | Year: 2005 | Quality: DVD-Audio (MLP 5.1 88.2kHz/24Bit, MLP 2.0 88.2kHz/24Bit, Dolby AC3 5.1, Dolby AC3 2.0) | Bitrate: lossless | Tracks: 13 | Size: ~7.55 Gb | Recovery: 5% | Release: © Warner Brothers Records, 2005 | Note: Watermarked

So where does a band go after releasing the most defiantly experimental record of its career? If you’re the Flaming Lips, you keep rushing headlong into the unknown — The Soft Bulletin, their follow-up to the four-disc gambit Zaireeka, is in many ways their most daring work yet, a plaintively emotional, lushly symphonic pop masterpiece eons removed from the mind-warping noise of their past efforts. Though more conventional in concept and scope than Zaireeka, The Soft Bulletin clearly reflects its predecessor’s expansive sonic palette. Its multidimensional sound is positively celestial, a shape-shifting pastiche of blissful melodies, heavenly harmonies, and orchestral flourishes; but for all its headphone-friendly innovations, the music is still amazingly accessible, never sacrificing popcraft in the name of radical experimentation. (Its aims are so perversely commercial, in fact, that hit R&B remixer Peter Mokran tinkered with the cuts “Race for the Prize” and “Waitin’ for a Superman” in the hopes of earning mainstream radio attention.) But what’s most remarkable about The Soft Bulletin is its humanity — these are Wayne Coyne’s most personal and deeply felt songs, as well as the warmest and most giving. No longer hiding behind surreal vignettes about Jesus, zoo animals, and outer space, Coyne pours his heart and soul into each one of these tracks, poignantly exploring love, loss, and the fate of all mankind; highlights like “The Spiderbite Song” and “Feeling Yourself Disintegrate” are so nakedly emotional and transcendentally spiritual that it’s impossible not to be moved by their beauty. There’s no telling where the Lips will go from here, but it’s almost beside the point — not just the best album of 1999, The Soft Bulletin might be the best record of the entire decade.

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